SEO Company in Johns Island, SC

If you are a business owner, there's probably a good chance that you have asked yourself this question before. It's a question that many entrepreneurs ask, and for good reason.

According to a recent study, the first five organic search results on Google account for about 67% of all website clicks. With more than 2.3 trillion Google searches in 2019 alone, it has become clear that if customers can't find your website online, you're missing out on a huge opportunity to grow your business.

The good news is, with a trustworthy SEO company in Charleston on your side and an effective SEO campaign, your website can show up on the first page of a Google search. The bad news is, many "SEO agencies" offering such services provide clients with outdated, a la carte options at ridiculous prices - and good luck getting them on the phone if you have a question that needs answering.

Unlike some of our competitors, mediocre customer service and ineffective digital marketing strategies aren't in our digital DNA.

Our innovative, all-inclusive SEO patented technology and services work together to form a digital marketing machine, unlike anything on the market. We call it Local Magic®.

What local SEO services in Johns Island can you expect? Keep reading to find out.

 SEO Company Johns Island, SC

Comprehensive Link Building

 SEO Johns Island, SC

Most veteran SEO professionals agree that one of the most important signals that Google uses to rank websites is backlinks. Backlinking is essentially a link that is created when one website links to another. According to recent statistics, 91% of webpages that don't get organic traffic are because they don't have any backlinks. Mr. Marketing solves this problem for you through comprehensive backlinking techniques, which adds authority to your website over time so that Google recognizes your website as trustworthy in your industry.

Online Review Management

 SEO Companies Johns Island, SC

Positive online reviews can be incredibly beneficial for your business. 93% of online shoppers say that online reviews play a part in their purchasing decisions. The problem is, many business owners don't have the time to request online reviews from happy clients, manage those reviews, or display them on their company's website.

That's where Mr. Marketing's Review Manager comes in. Review Manager is the world's first comprehensive reputation management system, allowing you to get more from your reviews. With Review Manager, you have the ability to request reviews via SMS and Email, track pending review requests, and even publish your most favorable reviews right to your website, with a few taps on your phone.

Website Optimization

 SEO Agencies Johns Island, SC

As local SEO consultants in Johns Island, we see a lot of good-looking websites. While a website might be attractive on the surface, it needs to be optimized on the backend for it to have a better chance of showing up in a Google search. Our team of skilled web developers will optimize your website both on the surface and "under the hood", so that your business gets noticed by customers who are already looking for the products or services you sell.

Website Hosting & Updates

 Local SEO Services Johns Island, SC

To make life a little easier, we are happy to host your website on our servers, so you don't have to hunt down a separate hosting service. If you have updates that need to be applied to your website, we will handle the heavy lifting for you. We even implement security measures to prevent hackers from accessing your data.

Google Ads Management

 SEO Firm Johns Island, SC

Here's a fact you might not know - Google controls more about 71% of the search engine market. If you want customers to find your business online, you need to show up in Google searches. As part of a comprehensive digital marketing strategy in Johns Island available from Mr. Marketing, Google Ads can be an excellent wayfor new clients to discover your business both on mobile devices and on desktops. Much like online reviews, however, managing a Google Ads campaign can be burdensome and time consuming for busy entrepreneurs. Our team will work closely with you to figure out the best ways to use Google Ads to your businesses advantage so that you can focus on day-to-day tasks while we grow your presence online.

Does Your Local SEO Company in Johns Island Care?

At Mr. Marketing, we really do care about your businesses success. Many local SEO consultants in Johns Island only care about their profits, but that's not a mantra that we agree with at Mr. Marketing. For that reason, we also include monthly digital business coaching as part of our Local Magic package. That way, your knowledge of digital marketing grows alongside your businesses website rankings.

When We Say All-Inclusive, We Mean It

Believe it or not, you get even more customized SEO services in Johns Island than those we listed above. While you may certainly pick and choose which digital marketing services work best for your unique situation, with our Local Magic package, you also gain access to:

  • Conversion Optimization
  • Programmatic Ad Management
  • Advertising Landing Page Development
  • Google My Business Management

So, what's the next step? We encourage you to reach out to our office or fill out the submission form on our website to get started. Once we understand your goals and business needs, we'll get to work right away, forming a custom marketing strategy for you. Before you know it, your phone will begin ringing, your reviews will start to pour in, your online connections will grow, and your website traffic will explode with interested clients looking to buy your products or services.

Latest News in Johns Island, SC

Newly proposed Charleston City Council districts give Johns Island its own representative

After a decade of booming population growth, Johns Island may get its own representative on Charleston City Council.But making that change could cost a sitting council member their seat.The island is now in District 5, which also spans much of outer West Ashley. It is represented by Councilman Karl Brady, who lives in West Ashley.Two newly proposed City Council district maps...

After a decade of booming population growth, Johns Island may get its own representative on Charleston City Council.

But making that change could cost a sitting council member their seat.

The island is now in District 5, which also spans much of outer West Ashley. It is represented by Councilman Karl Brady, who lives in West Ashley.

Two newly proposed City Council district maps make Johns Island its own district without any extension into West Ashley. That means the City Council member to represent it would have to live on Johns Island.

"There is no one on council right now that drives our roads every day, sends their kids to school here, works here or lives here," said John Zlogar, chairman of the Johns Island Task Force.

The group was established in 2013 to bring together residents and local officials to address Johns Island-specific issues.

While Zlogar said he has no issue with Brady, he said he would like to have a council member who can put their sole focus on the island.

"We will feel like we have someone that has our voice," he said.

The island, which is partially within the city of Charleston and partially within unincorporated Charleston County, has deep roots in agriculture and the city's Black history. Several Black family farms have run their businesses on the island since Reconstruction, when formerly enslaved laborers took over former plantations.

An "urban growth boundary," established across the island limits where agricultural land must be protected and where development is allowed. Most of the city's side of the island is located within the urban growth boundary and as a result has seen a massive influx of residents looking for a lower cost of living than the city's core. Between 2010 and 2020, District 5, the district with Johns Island and West Ashley, grew a staggering 154 percent.

The redistricting process

Charleston Chief Innovation Officer Tracy McKee has led the city through the redistricting process three times in her career. Factoring in population growth between 2010 and 2020, McKee and city staff have been in the process of redrawing the council district boundaries for months.

"Four council members live on the peninsula, but we've had more growth in Berkeley County on Daniel Island and on Johns Island," McKee said.

Every 10 years, the U.S. Census Bureau releases new population and demographic data that governments use to redraw voting districts. In 2020, it was delayed because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

City Council voted last summer to delay redistricting until after the fall 2021 election.

Officials try to balance the population size of each district as well as their geographic spread. In Charleston, for example, it would be impractical to include Daniel Island and outer West Ashley in the same district.

Initially, city staff put out one proposal in July. That plan kept all sitting council members within their current districts. None of them were at risk of losing their seat or having to run against each other to keep their seat. But the proposal split Johns island into three districts that included other areas of the city as well.

The map was met with some criticism for the wide span of geography each district covered. Districts were stretched from the peninsula far into West Ashley and District 11, covered parts of West Ashley, James Island and Johns Island.

The League of Women Voters published a commentary in The Post and Courier calling for more compact districts.

"Drawing districts to protect incumbents means the maps defy logic in many places. James Island remains divided into three different districts, one with very dubious contiguity as it crosses briefly over West Ashley and onto the peninsula. Johns Island, now all in District 5, will be divided into three different districts, diluting the voices of those residents," the league wrote.

The league now supports the new proposals, mainly because the districts don't stretch as far across the city.

"They keep communities together. These really prioritize citizen interests," said Leslie Skardon, the director of advocacy for the League of Women Voters.

Impact to incumbents

On Aug. 28, city staff unveiled two alternative maps that took some of that feedback into consideration. The two new maps, referred to as 1A and 1B, are almost identical except for their effects on two current peninsula districts.

Both maps make Johns Island its own district.

To create the Johns Island district, city staff proposed two options. They can move District 3 or District 6 off of the West Side of the peninsula to only cover West Ashley. If District 3 moves off, District 6 will absorb the portion of the West Side that is currently in District 3.

Because District 3 Councilman Jason Sakran lives on the peninsula, he would be drawn out of his district. He would have to run for District 6 against fellow Councilman William Dudley Gregorie. But that seat is not up for election until 2025. In the meantime, depending on when council decides to make the maps effective, a special election would determine who represents the new West Ashley-only version of District 3.

The other scenario would be that District 6 would move off of its portion of the West Side of the peninsula. In that case, Gregorie, who lives also in the West Side, would be drawn into Councilman Sakran's District 3. Because District 3 is up for election in 2023, the two would face off sooner.

Sakran said he would be OK with running against Gregorie in 2023, but he is most favorable of the original map that keeps all council members in their respective districts.

"You are overhauling peoples' elected representatives to the tune of 40 percent of the city's population," Sakran said of the new proposals.

According to the city, if the original proposal is accepted, about 30 percent of the city's population will end up in new council districts. If either of the alternatives are chosen, that number will move up to 39 percent.

Another factor in the process is the establishment of minority-majority districts. Districts 4 and 7 on the all three map proposals are majority-minority districts. They cover the upper peninsula and part of West Ashley, respectively. When the maps were last redrawn in 2010, the city went from having five majority-minority districts to three. Now the city is guaranteed to have two. As demographics shift, it's difficult to group minority voters together and ensure their voice is in the majority in any part of the city, McKee said.

City Council will review the map proposals at its Sept. 13 meeting. No action will be taken. A public hearing will be held in the fall. Residents can view the maps and leave comments online the city's redistricting "Open Town Hall" webpage at www.charleston-sc.gov/Redistricting2020. Email comments are accepted at [email protected].

Satirical Facebook post brings attention to Fort Johnson renovation

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A Facebook post got a lot of attention after making false claims about the Fort Johnson and May Forest renovation project.The post, which was created on Friday, got over 400 comments from upset and confused residents. It was created by the group “Charleston Municipality,” they made claims that the project is about international shipping and passenger cruise ships. They said on Saturday in a statement that “the post was obviously very satirical.”State Representative Spencer Wet...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A Facebook post got a lot of attention after making false claims about the Fort Johnson and May Forest renovation project.

The post, which was created on Friday, got over 400 comments from upset and confused residents. It was created by the group “Charleston Municipality,” they made claims that the project is about international shipping and passenger cruise ships. They said on Saturday in a statement that “the post was obviously very satirical.”

State Representative Spencer Wetmore says seeing the Facebook post and reactions from the public was heartbreaking.

“This is a project that we were really proud of,” Wetmore says. “I sort of understood the assignment here that people do not want to see a whole bunch of new development. People are concerned about flooding or concerned about traffic. To me, I certainly don’t want to see a bunch of houses and development there either. The people that made this post are obviously playing on people’s fears of that.”

The real Fort Johnson and May Forest renovation project started in March of 2022 and its goal is to tie together history, nature, research and environmental preservation.

The land on James Island is home to many different historical artifacts dating back to the late 1700′s. For the project to take place, a few old buildings will be torn down to make room for the renovations.

James Island Town Councilman Garrett Milliken says the stakeholders worked hard to keep history and rising sea levels in mind during the planning process.

“While the public might have been restricted with access to these locations in the past, the future will actually invite the public to enjoy the rich history of this location that will be in concordance with the research mission of this area as well,” Milliken says. “Both things are going to happen simultaneously at this location. So, I think it’s a win, win for both perspectives, history and research.”

Currently, the area is home to research for the Department of Natural Resources, the College of Charleston and the Marine Research Institute. All of their work will continue to move forward at the location after renovations take place.

“It really is the jewel of James Island,” Milliken says. “It has so much history, so much ecological significance. And frankly, the views are spectacular.”

The project website contains detailed maps and plans of what the entire area of Fort Johnson and May Forest should look like in the future. Despite the drama surrounding the Facebook post, Wetmore hopes the community becomes more aware about the actual project taking place.

“I just hope people will get excited about the park,” she says. “I know this Facebook post is just, honestly, just a mean joke.”

The “Charleston Municipality” Facebook group released the following statement on the post:

The post regarding the James Island Global Gateway Terminal was obviously very satirical, as it was intended being that Charleston Municipality is a satirical Facebook page. The main goal behind the post was to bring awareness to the rampant overdevelopment of not only James Island, but the entire Lowcountry, largely at the hands of our local elected officials and review boards. The post angered so many people, and those people are ready to put up a fight against this project. We want the same collective passion from everyone for all the development that is ACTUALLY taking place all around us. This “huge” and impactful project easily got peoples attention, but everyone needs to pay attention to all the projects that take place, as they are directly and negatively impacting our daily lives, largely due to a seemingly lack of oversight and shady deals being given to developers on a daily basis. Everyone must stay vigilant, and fight to preserve what we have before we have no more.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

MSNBC host Mehdi Hasan flips out on President Biden for saying 'pandemic is over'

Mehdi Hasan, host of MSNBC's "The Mehdi Hasan Show," reacted to a clip of President Biden saying during an interview with CBS News' Scott Pelley that the COVID-19 "pandemic is over.""One of the (many) reasons they’re not wearing masks is because people like Biden keep (falsely) telling them the pandemic is over," Hasan tweeted in response to the "60...

Mehdi Hasan, host of MSNBC's "The Mehdi Hasan Show," reacted to a clip of President Biden saying during an interview with CBS News' Scott Pelley that the COVID-19 "pandemic is over."

"One of the (many) reasons they’re not wearing masks is because people like Biden keep (falsely) telling them the pandemic is over," Hasan tweeted in response to the "60 Minutes" interview with Biden.

Pelley asked the president if the COVID-19 pandemic was over while walking through the Detroit Auto show.

"The pandemic is over. We still have a problem with COVID. We're still doing a lot of work on it," Biden said. "If you notice, no one's wearing a mask, everybody seems to be in pretty good shape and so I think it's changing, and this is a perfect example of it."

Pelley also asked the president if he would be running for re-election in 2024.

"Look, if I were to say to you, ‘I’m running again,’ all of a sudden, a whole range of things come into play that I have – requirements I have to change and move and do," Biden said, referring to election laws. "It’s much too early to make that kind of decision. I’m a great respecter of fate. And so, what I’m doing is, I’m doing my job. I’m gonna do that job. And within the timeframe that makes sense after this next election cycle here, going into next year, make a judgment on what to do."

CHUCK TODD ON NEW NBC POLL: BIDEN ‘GETTING A LIFT FROM SIMPLY DONALD TRUMP’S PRESENCE’

The CBS reporter continued to press the president on whether he would run again in 2024 and Biden said that he intends to run again, "but it's just an intention."

"But is it a firm decision that I run again? That remains to be seen," he said.

Pelley also asked the president if the U.S. would defend Taiwan.

"Yes, if in fact there was an unprecedented attack," Biden responded. "Taiwan makes their own judgments about their independence. We are not moving – we're not encouraging their being independent. We're not – that – that's their decision."

Biden's interview with CBS marked his first on air, sit-down interview with an American journalist in seven months.

The president sat down with NBC's Lester Holt in February, but the NBC appearance was Biden's first major media interview in four months.

CNBC host presses Biden economic adviser about how the admin continues to 'reject any blame' for inflation

CNBC "Squawk Box" host Joe Kernen pressed White House Council of Economic Advisers member Heather Boushey about how the Biden administration continues to "reject any blame" for high inflation."The administration, Biden Administration, usually rejects any blame for the highest inflation that we were just talking about in 40 years, blaming it on supply chain issues fro...

CNBC "Squawk Box" host Joe Kernen pressed White House Council of Economic Advisers member Heather Boushey about how the Biden administration continues to "reject any blame" for high inflation.

"The administration, Biden Administration, usually rejects any blame for the highest inflation that we were just talking about in 40 years, blaming it on supply chain issues from the pandemic yet at the same time, again, you take credit for creating 10 million jobs, which was a direct result of reopening after the pandemic you also take credit for reducing the deficit by $1.7 trillion, never acknowledging it was simply from not spending those emergency sums that we spent dealing with that pandemic, which you’re admitting caused the inflation, I guess, but had nothing to do with these other two factors," Kernen said. "It seems like you want to have it both ways."

Boushey said that the economy wasn't doing well when Biden came into office.

"This president put in place a set of policies that fixed the economy, put it on a better path, got jobs back. We created almost 10 million jobs under the president’s watch. That is an historic and impressive accomplishment that has been delivering for people around the country," she said.

BIDEN INTERVIEW WITH ’60 MINUTES’ MARKS FIRST ON-AIR SIT-DOWN WITH AMERICAN JOURNALIST IN SEVEN MONTHS

She added that the U.S. was not the only country struggling to bounce back from the COVID-19 pandemic.

"We’re not the only country that struggled with supply chains inflation is a global phenomena, as are the high oil prices. But here’s the thing, this president has done what he could to bring down gas prices as fast as he can. I believe today is day 97 or maybe yesterday was day 97 of straight declines in gas prices nationwide they’re down by 27% now," she continued.

Biden and his administration consistently blamed high gas prices on Russian President Vladimir Putin and the war in Ukraine as the price of gas hit $5 per gallon over the summer. Democrats and members of the administration were calling it the "Putin price hike."

The president sat down for an interview that aired over the weekend with CBS News' Scott Pelley that aired on "60 Minutes" on Sunday.

CHUCK TODD ON NEW NBC POLL: BIDEN ‘GETTING A LIFT FROM SIMPLY DONALD TRUMP’S PRESENCE’

Pelley asked what the administration could be doing better in responding to inflation.

"Well, first of all, let's put this in perspective. Inflation rate month to month was just-- just an inch, hardly at all," Biden said. Pelley added that it was the highest inflation rate in 40 years.

"I got that. But guess what we are. We're in a position where, for the last several months, it hasn't spiked. It has just barely-- it's been basically even. And in the meantime, we created all these jobs and-- and prices-- have-- have gone up, but they've come down for energy. The fact is that we've created 10 million new jobs. We're in-- since we came to office. We're in a situation where the-- the unemployment rate is about 3.7%. One of the lowest in history. We're in a situation where manufacturing is coming back to the United States in a big way. And look down the road, we have mas-- massive investments being made in computer chips and-- and employment. So, I-- look, this is a process. This is a process."

CNBC host Andrew Ross Sorkin asked Boushey about the president's comments.

"I believe what the president said was that he is working to get inflation under control, and it is good news that the monthly numbers have not been increasing at a rapid rate over the past couple months. It’s good to see that slowing," she said.

Troubling TikTok challenges inspire new, digital hall pass system

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - To fight back on an uptick in illicit behavior inspired by the social media platform TikTok, a Charleston County school is taking the traditional hall pass digital.Through an application called SmartPass, students at James Island Charter High School can request permission to leave the classroom for things like going to the restroom or stopping by their lockers. The app is downloaded to each school-issued laptop but can also be downloaded to a cell phone as well.“We have had people, unfortunately,...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - To fight back on an uptick in illicit behavior inspired by the social media platform TikTok, a Charleston County school is taking the traditional hall pass digital.

Through an application called SmartPass, students at James Island Charter High School can request permission to leave the classroom for things like going to the restroom or stopping by their lockers. The app is downloaded to each school-issued laptop but can also be downloaded to a cell phone as well.

“We have had people, unfortunately, try to sneak into our school and they’re not supposed to be here. Now, at any given moment, we know there should be, say, seven people in the hallway and who they are,” Principal Timothy Thorn said. “It has a lot of safety components that allows us to keep our buildings safer.”

While the app does not track movements, all active passes are monitored on a screen by the principal, student concern specialists or the school resource officer. When students are issued a pass, they’re given a time limit before they’re supposed to return. When they run out of time the pass turns red on the screen and school officials can then follow up as needed.

Thorn says this system is new for them this year and is a direct response to some of the issues exposed last year.

“Last year, there was a TikTok challenge that a lot of schools went through. Kids would text each other to leave class. They’d meet up and then they’d go around the building and film themselves doing various things. The TikTok challenge was vandalism and stealing things from school,” Thorn said. “We are trying to cut back on the vandalism in our school, the sinks being ripped off the wall. . . it’s not a new problem but it definitely escalated in the last couple years.”

The time allowed for each hall pass is adjustable. For now, Thorne says bathroom breaks are generally given five minutes, while trips to the water fountain could be three minutes. Students start with five bathroom passes a day, but Thorn says they’re still figuring out what works best and teachers have the authority to override daily limits.

The app also has a feature that can control which students can have hall passes at the same time. Thorn says this feature allows them to crack down on significant others who might want to meet up in the middle of class or prevent groups of students known to abuse bathroom privileges from all being allowed to leave the classroom at the same time.

Thorn says the feature helps them keep students safe who are being bullied.

“It’s really about the bullying, harassment and safety contracts,” Thorn said. “If we can say student A, B and C can’t be out with student D to make sure it [bullying] doesn’t go on, that’s a tremendous way to keep kids safe. We have had to have adults follow students around just to get through some of these school harassment issues.”

You can learn more about the app, how it works and some of the reviews at its website.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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