SEO Company in Mount Pleasant, SC

If you are a business owner, there's probably a good chance that you have asked yourself this question before. It's a question that many entrepreneurs ask, and for good reason.

According to a recent study, the first five organic search results on Google account for about 67% of all website clicks. With more than 2.3 trillion Google searches in 2019 alone, it has become clear that if customers can't find your website online, you're missing out on a huge opportunity to grow your business.

The good news is, with a trustworthy SEO company in Charleston on your side and an effective SEO campaign, your website can show up on the first page of a Google search. The bad news is, many "SEO agencies" offering such services provide clients with outdated, a la carte options at ridiculous prices - and good luck getting them on the phone if you have a question that needs answering.

Unlike some of our competitors, mediocre customer service and ineffective digital marketing strategies aren't in our digital DNA.

Our innovative, all-inclusive SEO patented technology and services work together to form a digital marketing machine, unlike anything on the market. We call it Local Magic®.

What local SEO services in Mount Pleasant can you expect? Keep reading to find out.

 SEO Company Mount Pleasant, SC

Comprehensive Link Building

 SEO Mount Pleasant, SC

Most veteran SEO professionals agree that one of the most important signals that Google uses to rank websites is backlinks. Backlinking is essentially a link that is created when one website links to another. According to recent statistics, 91% of webpages that don't get organic traffic are because they don't have any backlinks. Mr. Marketing solves this problem for you through comprehensive backlinking techniques, which adds authority to your website over time so that Google recognizes your website as trustworthy in your industry.

Online Review Management

 SEO Companies Mount Pleasant, SC

Positive online reviews can be incredibly beneficial for your business. 93% of online shoppers say that online reviews play a part in their purchasing decisions. The problem is, many business owners don't have the time to request online reviews from happy clients, manage those reviews, or display them on their company's website.

That's where Mr. Marketing's Review Manager comes in. Review Manager is the world's first comprehensive reputation management system, allowing you to get more from your reviews. With Review Manager, you have the ability to request reviews via SMS and Email, track pending review requests, and even publish your most favorable reviews right to your website, with a few taps on your phone.

Website Optimization

 SEO Agencies Mount Pleasant, SC

As local SEO consultants in Mount Pleasant, we see a lot of good-looking websites. While a website might be attractive on the surface, it needs to be optimized on the backend for it to have a better chance of showing up in a Google search. Our team of skilled web developers will optimize your website both on the surface and "under the hood", so that your business gets noticed by customers who are already looking for the products or services you sell.

Website Hosting & Updates

 Local SEO Services Mount Pleasant, SC

To make life a little easier, we are happy to host your website on our servers, so you don't have to hunt down a separate hosting service. If you have updates that need to be applied to your website, we will handle the heavy lifting for you. We even implement security measures to prevent hackers from accessing your data.

Google Ads Management

 SEO Firm Mount Pleasant, SC

Here's a fact you might not know - Google controls more about 71% of the search engine market. If you want customers to find your business online, you need to show up in Google searches. As part of a comprehensive digital marketing strategy in Mount Pleasant available from Mr. Marketing, Google Ads can be an excellent wayfor new clients to discover your business both on mobile devices and on desktops. Much like online reviews, however, managing a Google Ads campaign can be burdensome and time consuming for busy entrepreneurs. Our team will work closely with you to figure out the best ways to use Google Ads to your businesses advantage so that you can focus on day-to-day tasks while we grow your presence online.

Does Your Local SEO Company in Mount Pleasant Care?

At Mr. Marketing, we really do care about your businesses success. Many local SEO consultants in Mount Pleasant only care about their profits, but that's not a mantra that we agree with at Mr. Marketing. For that reason, we also include monthly digital business coaching as part of our Local Magic package. That way, your knowledge of digital marketing grows alongside your businesses website rankings.

When We Say All-Inclusive, We Mean It

Believe it or not, you get even more customized SEO services in Mount Pleasant than those we listed above. While you may certainly pick and choose which digital marketing services work best for your unique situation, with our Local Magic package, you also gain access to:

  • Conversion Optimization
  • Programmatic Ad Management
  • Advertising Landing Page Development
  • Google My Business Management

So, what's the next step? We encourage you to reach out to our office or fill out the submission form on our website to get started. Once we understand your goals and business needs, we'll get to work right away, forming a custom marketing strategy for you. Before you know it, your phone will begin ringing, your reviews will start to pour in, your online connections will grow, and your website traffic will explode with interested clients looking to buy your products or services.

Latest News in Mount Pleasant, SC

Carolina Park Elementary families fight for no rezoning

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) - The new school year is just getting started, but some parents fear it could be their child’s last year at Carolina Park Elementary School because of a possible rezoning plan that could send some students to another school.Around 200 or so people came to the District 2 Board of Constituents meeting for Charleston County School District Tuesday night. The overwhelming response from the families was that they do not want their kids rezoned. Some of the main reasons were for wanting their kids to keep b...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) - The new school year is just getting started, but some parents fear it could be their child’s last year at Carolina Park Elementary School because of a possible rezoning plan that could send some students to another school.

Around 200 or so people came to the District 2 Board of Constituents meeting for Charleston County School District Tuesday night. The overwhelming response from the families was that they do not want their kids rezoned. Some of the main reasons were for wanting their kids to keep biking and walking to school and not wanting their mental health to decline.

Brian Keels, the chief operating officer for Carolina Park Development, says he wants the parents who were under the understanding when they came to Carolina Park that their kids would attend these schools to stay there.

“So, I ask tonight that you please allow Carolina Park students to remain together in the community and not divide them,” Keels said.

The Charleston County School District planning team says Carolina Park Elementary is expected to be overcapacity by 2025. They plan to have students redistricted to neighboring schools like Laurel Hill and Charles Pinckney to prevent this from happening in the 2023 school year.

Carolina Park Elementary parents organized a walk from the Carolina Park neighborhood to the school to demonstrate against the rezoning.

“So, I’m here because my son loves riding his bike,” Kim Thomas, one Carolina Park Elementary parent, said. “It’s his highlight of his day. And they’re looking at taking him away and putting him on a bus and replacing him with other bus riders.”

After the walk, the District 2 Board of Constituents listened to feedback from parents on this issue and reviewed the three-day preliminary enrollment data from the planning team.

The five members of the board say they don’t feel comfortable deciding on the rezoning right now after considering the new numbers.

“Obviously, none of these maps are going to fit a potential rezoning unless you guys want to rezone 200 kids,” Board Chair Pamela Jouan-Goldman said. “Which personally, I don’t want to.”

Board members say they’re waiting to see updated 10-day enrollment numbers before making a decision. Though if rezoning doesn’t happen, it’s not clear what the board will do to address overcapacity concerns.

Other Carolina Park parents, like Kelley and Adam Deaton, say they are happy to see the board starting to side with them on possibly not allowing the rezoning.

“I think they saw, ‘Hey, we need more facts before we can move ahead with this.’” Adam Deaton said. “So, we are hoping as they start to get the better projections that, you know, they see it exactly how much this community wants to stay at this school.”

The board says the decision will be discussed publicly at the next Board of Constituents meeting.

Here are the proposed rezoning plans and Tuesday’s meeting information:

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Kevin Sunderman, CGCS, named GCSAA chief operating officer

Experienced golf industry leader assumes COO position Nov. 7Lawrence, Kan. (Sept. 19, 2022) – After nearly two decades as a golf course superintendent, Kevin P. Sunderman, CGCS, has been named chief operating officer (COO) for the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA).Sunderman comes to GCSAA uniquely qualified for the position, with more than 19 years of experience in professional golf course management, prior experience in the financial services sector, a bachelor’s degree from the Oh...

Experienced golf industry leader assumes COO position Nov. 7

Lawrence, Kan. (Sept. 19, 2022) – After nearly two decades as a golf course superintendent, Kevin P. Sunderman, CGCS, has been named chief operating officer (COO) for the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA).

Sunderman comes to GCSAA uniquely qualified for the position, with more than 19 years of experience in professional golf course management, prior experience in the financial services sector, a bachelor’s degree from the Ohio State University in turfgrass management and a master’s degree in business administration from Florida Southern College.

He most recently spent 17 years at Isla Del Sol Yacht and Country Club in St. Petersburg, Fla., where he was director of grounds. He previously held the superintendent position at Whetstone Golf Club in Caledonia, Ohio, and assistant superintendent position at TPC at Prestancia in Sarasota, Fla.; Snee Farm Country Club in Mount Pleasant, S.C.; and East Lake Woodlands Country Club in Oldsmar, Fla. During his career, Sunderman developed his skills beyond professional golf course management by leading multiple long-range strategic planning initiatives and gaining financial management experience as a Series 7-licensed financial advisor.

After six years on the GCSAA Board of Directors, Sunderman has had deep exposure to the GCSAA headquarters team, including work with the GCSAA Conference and Trade Show, corporate partners, education, diversity, equity and inclusion efforts, advocacy, environmental programs and the GCSAA Foundation.

“When the opportunity arose for Kevin to join the GCSAA team, we knew we had found our next COO,” GCSAA Chief Executive Officer Rhett Evans said. “His knowledge of GCSAA and the industry, business acumen and leadership skills provide the association with a speed of transition that will prove advantageous as we expand and enhance the programs and services we deliver to our membership. All members will continue to benefit from his knowledge, passion and dedication.”

Sunderman has been a GCSAA member for 21 years and became a certified golf course superintendent in 2019. He is a past president of the Florida GCSA and Florida West Coast GCSA and served on various national GCSAA committees. He was first appointed to the GCSAA Board of Directors in 2017, was elected vice president earlier this year, and was nominated to be GCSAA president in 2023. Sunderman will relinquish his position on the board to become COO. The transition of Sunderman’s Board responsibilities and details regarding this process will be announced in upcoming communications.

“I am extremely excited to be joining GCSAA as the COO. Being a member of the association has had a tremendous impact on my life and career as a golf course superintendent.,” Sunderman said. “From the time I first served on a chapter board to the GCSAA Board of Directors, it was always about service and leadership. That hasn’t changed. This gives me the opportunity to continue to serve the industry that has meant so much to me in a new way.”

Sunderman succeeds outgoing COO Bob Randquist, CGCS, who is retiring Oct. 15 after four and a half years on the staff and 46 years as a GCSAA member. As COO, Sunderman will be responsible for managing a broad and complex array of functions and facilitate multiple projects to meet the objectives of the association. While he will represent GCSAA and maintain relationships with industry and allied partners, his main focus will be on internal stakeholders and being an integral part of the headquarters’ culture.

“The past six years serving on the GCSAA board provided me with valuable opportunities to develop relationships with GCSAA Chapter leaders, as well as to meet, listen and learn from many GCSAA members while expanding my knowledge of the great way GCSAA staff serve our members,” Sunderman said. “As COO, I am looking forward to using these insights to guide the GCSAA team in providing benefits that will have a true impact on the lives of our members. I appreciate everyone at Isla Del Sol Yacht and Country Club; they are a wonderful group of people that I will truly miss,”

Sunderman, whose family includes his wife, Melani, son, Trent, and daughter, Elise, will relocate from Florida to Kansas for his new role at GCSAA headquarters. He will begin his tenure as COO on Nov. 7.

About GCSAAThe Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA) is a leading golf organization in the United States. Its focus is on golf course management, and since 1926 GCSAA has been the top professional association for the men and women who manage golf courses in the U.S. and worldwide. From its headquarters in Lawrence, Kan., the association provides education, information and representation to more than 19,000 members in more than 78 countries. The association’s mission is to serve its members, advance their profession and improve communities through enjoyment, growth and vitality of the game of golf. Visit GCSAA at www.gcsaa.org or find us on Facebook or Twitter. Visit our industry-leading magazine at GCMonline.com.

The GCSAA Foundation is the philanthropic organization of the GCSAA. Its mission is to secure funding and support to strengthen advocacy, education, and research that advances the work of golf course management professionals. Visit the Foundation at www.gcsaa.org/foundation.

Contact: Angela HartmannDirector, Communications Phone: 800-472-7878, ext. 3647 or 785-393-1361 (cell) [email protected]

New dining concept proposed for darkened Mount Pleasant restaurant

A Mount Pleasant seafood restaurant that was open about a year has gone dark, and the owners are planning a new dining venture in its place.A sign on the door of the former Locals Seafood & Rawbar at 545 Belle Station Blvd. off Long Point Road states the closing is temporar...

A Mount Pleasant seafood restaurant that was open about a year has gone dark, and the owners are planning a new dining venture in its place.

A sign on the door of the former Locals Seafood & Rawbar at 545 Belle Station Blvd. off Long Point Road states the closing is temporary and a new concept is coming soon.

The site in Planet Fitness-anchored Belle Station was once the home of Red & Roadiee’s Restaurant and Bar.

A restaurant representative did not immediately respond for comment on the closing and planned venture.

The darkened restaurant was a new concept by the owner of Locals Sushi & Sports Pub, which has two locations in the Charleston area. They are at 1150 Queensborough Blvd. in Mount Pleasant and at 1680 Old Towne Road in West Ashley, where Manny’s Mediterranean Grille once operated.

What’s cooking?

A new restaurant is opening in Summerville.

PrimoHoagies will host its grand opening at 10 a.m. Sept. 15 at 2121 N. Main St. Owners Christine and Curtis Hackeloer, who have lived in the Charleston area for the past 12 years, will snip the ribbon in a 9:45 a.m. ceremony for the 1,600-square-foot shop.

The first 100 customers in line on opening day who are enrolled in the restaurant’s complimentary rewards program will receive a free hoagie.

The casual restaurant’s menu features a variety of cold and hot hoagies, cheesesteaks, wraps, vegetarian options, sides, chips, drinks, cookies, desserts and other items. The shop will be open 10 a.m.-8 p.m. daily and will offer dine-in, takeout and delivery options along with catering trays.

Also on the way is a new food venue on James Island.

Wisconsin Meat & Cheese plans to open by late October in a 1,504-square-foot space at 1027 Folly Road, according to its Facebook page. The new shop will be in in Sumter’s Landing retail center where Avalon Vapor, Papa John’s Pizza and Ultratan also operate.

Lighting the way

A custom lampshade maker plans to open its first store in downtown Charleston.

Retailer Sorella Glenn plans to open The Lampshade Library in mid-October at 141 Market St.

The new store will offer an experiential environment that allows customers to customize lampshades, take them home on approval, and work on one piece or an entire home at the library bar.

“Our lampshades are customizable, and with additional options at The Lampshade Library, we will continue to deliver bespoke shades to the consumer,” said Katy Glenn Roe, co-owner. “Charleston is ideal for launching our first boutique from Sorella Glenn. Local designers, stylish homeowners and city visitors are the perfect guests for our library.”

Sorella Glenn started making the colorful lampshades in 2019. Each shade is made to order according to the specifications of the customer. Color, trim and pleat style are just a few of the choices.

Repositioned

A Moncks Corner thrift store with proceeds supporting drug rehabilitation efforts is opening in a new location that will more than double its size.

CLM Resale Store, which supports Changed Lives Ministry, will open at 9 a.m. Sept. 17 in a 16,000-square-foot facility at 502 E. Main St., according to board member Mickey White.

The shop carries furniture, clothes, shoes, jewelry and an array of other donated items.

All proceeds from sales go toward helping to rehabilitate those with drug addictions through a free 13-week in-house program at Changed Lives Ministry’s separate sites for men and women in the Berkeley County town.

The leased resale store space is currently at 506 E. Main St. The nonprofit bought the former Central Hardware location next to its current shop in June for $765,000 after outgrowing its current store, White said.

The main new store building is 11,000 square feet. A 4,000-square-foot warehouse and another metal building with about 1,500 square feet also are on the property.

The new store will be open 9 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday.

Now open

Also in the realm of resale shops, a new thrift store is now welcoming customers in Mount Pleasant.

God’s Goods Thrift Store opened Sept. 10 in the Aldi-anchored Plaza at East Cooper Shopping Center on Johnnie Dodds Boulevard.

The store is operated by volunteers, and 100 percent of the proceeds, after covering expenses for rent, utilities, insurance and supplies each month, will be distributed to local, national and international missions.

An 11-person mission committee of volunteers and representatives from local churches will review applications for ongoing and single donations. A list of missions receiving funds from God’s Goods will be published on an ongoing basis.

The nonprofit shop, which is not aligned with any church or organization, is patterned after its sister store in Bluffton, where more than $3 million in net profit has been contributed since it opened in 2010.

The store’s purpose is “to make available gently used items that many folks in Mount Pleasant no longer need and are willing to donate to be sold at very affordable prices.”

New location

A beauty retailer is hosting its grand-reopening in Mount Pleasant. Aillea can now be found at 280 W. Coleman Blvd.

On the way

A new vehicle maintenance shop is coming to North Charleston.

Take 5 Oil Change plans to build a new facility at 8840 Dorchester Road on an outparcel in Plantation Square Shopping Center, according to the commercial real estate firm NAI Charleston, which represented the 0.66-acre land sale of $1.2 million.

The shop will be Take 5′s sixth location in the Charleston area. An opening date has not been announced.

Gassing up

A new convenience store and gas station is in the works for a busy West Ashley intersection.

Charleston’s Design Review Board will consider initial approval of a new Parker’s Kitchen at Sam Rittenberg Boulevard and Ashley River Road on Sept. 19.

The Savannah-based company plans to build a 3,800-square-foot retail store with 12 fueling stations where a Wells Fargo bank branch closed more than a year ago.

Mt. Pleasant short-term rental owners fighting proposed operational changes

MT. PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Proposed changes to the Town of Mt. Pleasant’s short-term rental (STR) ordinance have many rental owners pushing back.Michele Reed, the town’s Planning Director, says the ordinance needs to be tightened up and language clarified after some issues have come up since it went into effect in January 2020.A public hearing during a planning commission meeting Wednesday br...

MT. PLEASANT, S.C. (WCBD) – Proposed changes to the Town of Mt. Pleasant’s short-term rental (STR) ordinance have many rental owners pushing back.

Michele Reed, the town’s Planning Director, says the ordinance needs to be tightened up and language clarified after some issues have come up since it went into effect in January 2020.

A public hearing during a planning commission meeting Wednesday brought at least two dozen STR owners to oppose the proposed changes.

“This is your time to stop and listen to what the people are saying,” said one rental owner.

“We are not the issue, we are the experts,” said another.

One proposed change to the ordinance would be changing the language to enforce the cap of short-term rental permits at 400.

That’s what’s written in the current ordinance, yet the current STR permit allotment sits above that due to longtime STR owners being grandfathered in, according to an STR owner.

Laurie Bixler, who owns and operates two short-term rentals in town says she believes the cap should be the only change made to the ordinance.

“I believe the only thing that should be changed right now is to clarify the cap and come up with a system to attrition is back to the 400, if that’s what the council wishes,” said Bixler. “I would like to see all the red lining and all the draft changes put aside for now.”

She and other rental owners believe the proposed changes are more harmful than helpful. That includes Mari Ricozzi, another longtime STR operator.

She is concerned about a possible fee increase that would come along with a proposed two-tiered system.

One tier, considered part-time, would include STR owners that rent their properties between 15-72 days out of the year. 15 is the minimum to qualify for a permit. Lower tier permit holders would pay a 4% tax rate to the county and a $250 permit fee to the town.

The other tier, considered full-time, would include STR owners that rent their properties more than 72 days out of the year. That would come with a 6% tax rate to the county and a $500 permit fee to the town.

Previously, the planning commission was considering a $1,500 fee for full-time operators, but that was taken out of the proposed ordinance and knocked down to $500.

Ricozzi is a full-time operator who says she shouldn’t have to pay more for having a successful business.

“So in essence, my fee would be doubled. So I’m being penalized,” she said. “I was a little disappointed that the commission didn’t seem to grasp the reality of how this document will change the business for us. There are so many little nuances that are put into this ordinance that puts strains on us as a business that other businesses in town don’t necessarily have to comply with.”

Other changes include possible changes to guest parking and more.

Ricozzi says this isn’t the end of the fight and she will work with other STR owners in town to continue to push back against the proposed changes.

“We have an organization called STRAMP which is Short-Term Rental Association of Mt. Pleasant. We plan on meeting again before the planning committee meeting next month so hopefully, this isn’t the end.”

The planning commission voted to push the proposed changes forward. They will be heard by the planning committee next month and if given the green light, the full town council will have the final decision.

Fitness studio geared towards kids opens in Mount Pleasant

Beach Cowboy Fitness offers inclusive gym classes for homeschooled, challenged and neurodivergent children at its Mount Pleasant location on Queensborough Boulevard.Owners Cynthia and Cameron Lett, a mother-son duo, started Beach Cowboy Fitness to improve a societal issue: the degradation of communication and interpersonal skills in today’s youth.“We’re trying to turn that around through fitness and fun,” said Cynthia.Nearly 22% of schools have no physical education programs at all and only 4% of ...

Beach Cowboy Fitness offers inclusive gym classes for homeschooled, challenged and neurodivergent children at its Mount Pleasant location on Queensborough Boulevard.

Owners Cynthia and Cameron Lett, a mother-son duo, started Beach Cowboy Fitness to improve a societal issue: the degradation of communication and interpersonal skills in today’s youth.

“We’re trying to turn that around through fitness and fun,” said Cynthia.

Nearly 22% of schools have no physical education programs at all and only 4% of elementary schools have daily gym classes, according to social scientist Claire Nader. Meanwhile physical education is the only class known to improve physical, mental and emotional health, as well as executive function. Students who participate in gym class are more likely to see improvement in math and reading, thanks to a higher level of effective executive function.

Despite the proven, important role exercise plays in cognitive development and social skills, gym classes are one of the first things to be cut as schools tighten their budgets.

This is precisely what Cynthia and Cameron Lett hope to counter. Their fitness classes teach children the fundamentals of exercising, including how to warm up and cool down, but their larger focus is creating a sense of camaraderie. Students participate in a combination of games that are competitive, with an urgency to work together in teams to achieve a common goal.

All the games and classes at Beach Cowboy Fitness are inclusive and adaptive to students with physical or intellectual challenges.

“We make adjustments so everyone can participate, and they don’t feel left out or unable to achieve,” said Cynthia.

They also encourage children of all levels and abilities to work together. “Neurotypical students are going to learn how to work with students who have challenges — they’ll learn empathy, accommodation, and practice kindness. They’re all going to have the same competitive opportunities,” Cynthia added.

Gym classes at Beach Cowboy Fitness focus on winning and losing graciously. Negativity, name calling and bullying are not tolerated.

Instead, students will learn how to celebrate the opposing team’s wins and encourage them after their losses. The goal is for students to understand that just because their team lost, it doesn’t mean they’re losers.

“We think it’s important that reality is very much a part of the curriculum,” said Cynthia.

Beach Cowboy Fitness follows the South Carolina Department of Physical Education Program, so students can earn academic credit after completing two semesters, with a minimum of two classes per week for 18 weeks in a semester. Programs for homeschooled children can be purchased by the semester. Each class is based on the grades the children are in with forms and assessments completed by their coaches after each class. Financing options are available for semester purchases.

All classes are limited to ten children with two certified coaches: Cameron Lett and Eliza Athans. During special needs classes, family members and friends of the student are welcome to purchase a membership and participate with them.

Beach Cowboy Fitness is located at 1200 Queensborough Blvd., Suite B, in Mount Pleasant. To learn more, visit their website at beachcowboyfitness.com or call (843) 438-4833.

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