SEO Company in North Charleston SC

If you are a business owner, there’s probably a good chance that you have asked yourself this question before. It’s a question that many entrepreneurs ask, and for good reason.

According to a recent study, the first five organic search results on Google account for about 67% of all website clicks. With more than 2.3 trillion Google searches in 2019 alone, it has become clear that if customers can’t find your website online, you’re missing out on a huge opportunity to grow your business.

The good news is, with a trustworthy SEO company in Charleston on your side and an effective SEO campaign, your website can show up on the first page of a Google search. The bad news is, many “SEO agencies” offering such services provide clients with outdated, a la carte options at ridiculous prices – and good luck getting them on the phone if you have a question that needs answering.

Unlike some of our competitors, mediocre customer service and ineffective digital marketing strategies aren’t in our digital DNA.

Our innovative, all-inclusive SEO patented technology and services work together to form a digital marketing machine, unlike anything on the market. We call it Local Magic®.

What local SEO services in North Charleston can you expect? Keep reading to find out.

A Guide to Google My Business

Comprehensive Link Building

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Most veteran SEO professionals agree that one of the most important signals that Google uses to rank websites is backlinks. Backlinking is essentially a link that is created when one website links to another. According to recent statistics, 91% of webpages that don’t get organic traffic are because they don’t have any backlinks. Mr. Marketing solves this problem for you through comprehensive backlinking techniques, which adds authority to your website over time so that Google recognizes your website as trustworthy in your industry.

Online Review Management

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Positive online reviews can be incredibly beneficial for your business. 93% of online shoppers say that online reviews play a part in their purchasing decisions. The problem is, many business owners don’t have the time to request online reviews from happy clients, manage those reviews, or display them on their company’s website.

That’s where Mr. Marketing’s Review Manager comes in. Review Manager is the world’s first comprehensive reputation management system, allowing you to get more from your reviews. With Review Manager, you have the ability to request reviews via SMS and Email, track pending review requests, and even publish your most favorable reviews right to your website, with a few taps on your phone.

Website Optimization

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As local SEO consultants in North Charleston, we see a lot of good-looking websites. While a website might be attractive on the surface, it needs to be optimized on the backend for it to have a better chance of showing up in a Google search. Our team of skilled web developers will optimize your website both on the surface and “under the hood”, so that your business gets noticed by customers who are already looking for the products or services you sell.

Website Hosting & Updates

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To make life a little easier, we are happy to host your website on our servers, so you don’t have to hunt down a separate hosting service. If you have updates that need to be applied to your website, we will handle the heavy lifting for you. We even implement security measures to prevent hackers from accessing your data.

Google Ads Management

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Here’s a fact you might not know – Google controls more about 71% of the search engine market. If you want customers to find your business online, you need to show up in Google searches. As part of a comprehensive digital marketing strategy in North Charleston available from Mr. Marketing, Google Ads can be an excellent wayfor new clients to discover your business both on mobile devices and on desktops. Much like online reviews, however, managing a Google Ads campaign can be burdensome and time consuming for busy entrepreneurs. Our team will work closely with you to figure out the best ways to use Google Ads to your businesses’ advantage so that you can focus on day-to-day tasks while we grow your presence online.

Does Your Local SEO Company in North Charleston Care?

At Mr. Marketing, we really do care about your businesses’ success. Many local SEO consultants in North Charleston only care about their profits, but that’s not a mantra that we agree with at Mr. Marketing. For that reason, we also include monthly digital business coaching as part of our Local Magic package. That way, your knowledge of digital marketing grows alongside your businesses’ website rankings.

When We Say All-Inclusive, We Mean It

Believe it or not, you get even more customized SEO services in North Charleston than those we listed above. While you may certainly pick and choose which digital marketing services work best for your unique situation, with our Local Magic package, you also gain access to:

  • Conversion Optimization
  • Programmatic Ad Management
  • Advertising Landing Page Development
  • Google My Business Management

So, what’s the next step? We encourage you to reach out to our office or fill out the submission form on our website to get started. Once we understand your goals and business needs, we’ll get to work right away, forming a custom marketing strategy for you. Before you know it, your phone will begin ringing, your reviews will start to pour in, your online connections will grow, and your website traffic will explode with interested clients looking to buy your products or services.

Latest News in North Charleston

SC Ports CEO delivers State of the Port Address, announces retirement

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The head of the South Carolina Ports Authority delivered what he called his 13th and final State of the Port address Monday afternoon.SCPA President and CEO Jim Newsome announced he plans to retire from his position at the end of June 2022, extending his current contract which was set to end this December.He said the port’s board named Barbara Melvin, who currently serves as the ports’ chief operating officer to be the Ports Authority’s next leader effective July 1.He said he w...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The head of the South Carolina Ports Authority delivered what he called his 13th and final State of the Port address Monday afternoon.

SCPA President and CEO Jim Newsome announced he plans to retire from his position at the end of June 2022, extending his current contract which was set to end this December.

He said the port’s board named Barbara Melvin, who currently serves as the ports’ chief operating officer to be the Ports Authority’s next leader effective July 1.

He said he would be an executive advisor for one year after his retirement.

“While the global supply chain remains under tremendous pressure, SC Ports has strategically invested to ensure efficient operations, providing retailers with the capacity and fluidity they need, particularly as we head into peak season,” Newsome said.

SC Ports moved 205,008 twenty-foot equivalent units at Wando Welch Terminal, North Charleston Terminal and Hugh K. Leatherman Terminal in September, setting a record for the month. This is a 5% increase year-over-year.

Fiscal-year-to-date, SC Ports has handled 684,517 TEUs at its container terminals, up nearly 18% from the same time a year ago.

“Capacity is the new port currency, and SC Ports has the right capacity at the right time to meet retailers’ and companies’ needs,” Newsome said. “We have built the best infrastructure in the U.S. port industry.”

SC Ports is the only port in the country with new terminal capacity, Newsome said, adding that the $1 billion Phase One of Leatherman Terminal opened in March, adding a berth and 700,000 TEUs of capacity to the East Coast port market, ensuring speed-to-market for customers.

“Companies with global supply chains want to locate near well-run ports. Port growth creates jobs and investments,” Newsome said. “SC Ports generates a $63.4B annual economic impact and creates 1 in 10 jobs in South Carolina.”

Gov. Henry McMaster proclaimed this week as South Carolina Ports Week throughout the state.

“I encourage all South Carolinians “to recognize our maritime community for its successful endeavors in international maritime trade and the impact it makes on our great state,” McMaster said.

McMaster made the proclamation just before Newsome’s State of the Port Address.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

North Charleston targets $25M for sidewalks, other infrastructure improvements

NORTH CHARLESTON — Councilwoman Virginia Jamison carefully walks the thin shoulder that runs beside ditches along Deerwood Drive.The residential road, used often by commuters as a cut-through, lacks sidewalks. Jamison thinks not only about her safety but also the safety of her constituents, such as the students who use the road to access school buses.“If they had sidewalks, they’d be on the sidewalks and not in the street,” Jamison said.The lack of sidewalks is prevalent throughout North Charlesto...

NORTH CHARLESTON — Councilwoman Virginia Jamison carefully walks the thin shoulder that runs beside ditches along Deerwood Drive.

The residential road, used often by commuters as a cut-through, lacks sidewalks. Jamison thinks not only about her safety but also the safety of her constituents, such as the students who use the road to access school buses.

“If they had sidewalks, they’d be on the sidewalks and not in the street,” Jamison said.

The lack of sidewalks is prevalent throughout North Charleston’s older communities. Many of the neighborhoods, like Deerwood, were built long before 2000, which is when the city began requiring new development to include sidewalks. The city is making an effort to address the issue. It plans to use $25 million worth of proceeds from a recent bond sale to finance infrastructure improvements. New sidewalks are top priority for many council members, though pedestrian crossings and drainage improvements have also been discussed.

Some community leaders are glad to see progress on the horizon, though they also urge the city do more to address neighborhoods’ infrastructure needs.

The money will be split into $2.5 million for each of North Charleston’s 10 City Council districts. Plans are still in the early stages. The city doesn’t know yet how many square footage of sidewalks the project will entail. Planning and public works staff are meeting with council members to discuss infrastructure improvement options. The city also hasn’t consulted yet with S.C. Department of Transportation, which owns many of the roads in the city. The city will need permits from DOT for sidewalk installation on state-owned roads.

DOT said North Charleston efforts align with the agency’s Complete Streets policy. The policy requires DOT to work with regional transportation partners to include walking needs as part of regional plans.

“DOT looks forward to working with the North Charleston leaders to improve pedestrian accommodations within their city,” said spokesman Pete Poore.

What’s important is that the funds are in place, said Mayor Keith Summey.

“The money is there,” Summey said. “That’s always the key factor. We’re meeting with City Council members now and looking at projects they want and getting a cost analysis on those projects.”

Increasing connectivity

The money isn’t enough to to cover an entire community with new sidewalks. That’s why the city planners have been looking mainly at increasing connectivity throughout neighborhoods by filling in existing sidewalk gaps.

″(Council members) don’t have enough money to do a whole neighborhood,” said Deputy Planning Director Megan Clark. “During discussions, we were focusing on proximity to corridors, bus stops and schools. ... As we create options for (council members), that’s an opportunity for them to go back to neighborhood meetings and talk about options and what is the overall best interest of the neighborhoods.”

Having sidewalks that lead to schools should be a top priority for council members, Summey said.

The mayor said the city has maintained sidewalks and created new ones as best as it can as funds have been available. This has been a challenge. Summey pointed out that the city in the 1990s annexed a number of neighborhoods that had seen little investment, such as Union Heights, Accabee, Dorchester Terrace and Dorchester Waylyn.

The communities, which are predominately Black, lack sufficient number of pathways to properly accommodate pedestrians.

Some of these neighborhoods can’t accommodate sidewalks. In Union Heights, for example, there isn’t enough right of way around the neighborhood’s slim streets. Sidewalk installation would require use of private properties. In Union Heights, the city will likely focus on other improvements, such as fixing drainage issues, Summey said.

But wherever feasible, the city should address the need for walkable paths, said Omar Muhammad, executive director of the Lowcountry Alliance for Model Communities.

Not only do sidewalks provide people a safe path to move about in their neighborhoods, but the infrastructure also promotes healthy lifestyles, Muhammad said. Health disparities often exist in neighborhoods that lack pathways that safely accommodate walkers and cyclists, he said.

“You see (health disparities) existing in those communities because of the lack of that type of infrastructure,” he said.

For Councilman Michael Brown, safety is the top concern. He has hopes to add sidewalks in Accabee and Dorchester Terrace.

“When folks are walking in a lot of these areas, they’re walking in the streets,” Brown said. “That’s a safety issue.”

‘Tale of two cities’

Not all neighborhoods lack sidewalks, particularly the city’s newer communities. The Wescott community off Dorchester Road includes sidewalks that provide safe pathways to subdivisions and a shopping complex.

“We all know when it comes to sidewalks, we have a tale of two cities,” said Councilman Ron Brinson said.

The funds are a step in the right direction, but more can be done to improve quality of life in older neighborhoods, Jamison said.

Deer Park, created in the 1940s, today is populated with over a thousand homes. The neighborhood, like all others, could benefit from a North Charleston livability study, Jamison said.

Such a study would survey residents in all of the city’s neighborhoods to determine the communities’ needs, she said. It would also that no neighborhood is ignored, Jamison said.

“Deer Park has been left behind in so many ways,” Jamison said.

Brinson is concerned about how growth is impacting North Charleston neighborhoods in Dorchester County, an area that’s been one of the fastest-growing sections of the city. The Wescott community has seen increased cut-through traffic. Commuters use Wescott and Patriot Boulevards, originally built as neighborhood roads, to avoid gridlock along Dorchester Road.

Brinson fears the problem will worsen as a number of road projects loom on the horizon, including Charleston County’s Palmetto Commerce Interchange.

“We’ve got to do the best we can to protect the neighborhood ambiance,” he said.

As North Charleston moves forward with its infrastructure plans, Muhammad thinks the city should also engage with residents about why the infrastructure improvements are needed.

Particularly in low-wealth areas that haven’t seen significant investment, improvements could raise concern about gentrification, Muhammad said.

“I like that the city is allocating some funds towards infrastructure improvements,” he said. “But concurrent with that work, they need to reach out to the community to lessen concerns around gentrification.”

Meanwhile, the city will work to help ensure its neighborhoods have safe paths to walk and run.

SC Stingrays are back with ‘huge turnover’ after run to Kelly Cup finals

After a quick turnaround from last season’s charge to the ECHL Kelly Cup finals, the South Carolina Stingrays are back.And yes, they are playing in the North Charleston Coliseum.The Stingrays finished off last season with a playoff run at their practice facility at the Carolina Ice Palace because the coliseum was not available at the end of a COVID-delayed season.The team opens its 2021-22 season on Oct. 23 at the North Charleston Coliseum with a 6:05 p.m. game against Greenville, and team president Rob Concannon i...

After a quick turnaround from last season’s charge to the ECHL Kelly Cup finals, the South Carolina Stingrays are back.

And yes, they are playing in the North Charleston Coliseum.

The Stingrays finished off last season with a playoff run at their practice facility at the Carolina Ice Palace because the coliseum was not available at the end of a COVID-delayed season.

The team opens its 2021-22 season on Oct. 23 at the North Charleston Coliseum with a 6:05 p.m. game against Greenville, and team president Rob Concannon is planning for a return to something resembling normalcy.

“That’s what we’re hoping for, as I’m sure everyone is,” said Concannon. “And I think we’re getting there.”

After opening last season at 50 percent capacity at the coliseum, the Stingrays are operating at full capacity to start this season. And the ECHL, which operated with just 14 teams a year ago, should be back up to full strength at 28 teams.

“It’s right back to where it was two years ago,” Concannon said.

The Stingrays themselves have seen a lot of turnover since their game four loss to Fort Wayne in the Kelly Cup finals back in June. The number is fluid as players come and go, but there are seven former Stingrays on the opening-day roster, including veteran and team captain Andrew Cherniwchan.

“There’s been a huge turnover this past offseason,” Concannon said. “We lost about 12 guys to retirement, and lost another nine guys or so who either have gone to Europe or other teams.

“The majority of the players are going to be new to our team, and we’re seeing that around the league, as well. This summer it was a little different with 14 more teams trying to get players in building rosters and stuff.”

Joining Cherniwchan on the roster are returnees Justin Florek, Connor Moore, Tariq Hammond and Jade Miller. Goalie Hunter Shepard, who minded the net during the Stingrays’ playoff run, was assigned to the Stingrays this week by their AHL affiliate in Hershey.

Also assigned by Hershey this week were forward Ryan Dmowski and defenseman Jake Massie, who played with Stingrays goalie Ryan Bednard in Greenville last year.

Charged with putting the pieces together is second-year coach Ryan Blair.

“It’s important to have some guys back,” said Blair. “We would like to have a couple more guys back, but with Europe in full swing and guys moving on from hockey, it’s definitely understandable and we respect these players decisions. I really like the guys we’ve brought back, and they are going to be important pieces for us.

“But it’s a whole different team this year and kind of a different feel in the room, and we’re excited about it.”

Among the new players is forward Lawton Courtnall, a 6-0, 210-pounder who played 54 games with Wheeling last year and college hockey at Western Michigan. Veteran center Ben Holmstrom has played in the NHL with Philadelphia and Carolina, and in the AHL.

“Ben has been a real leader at the next level, and he’s already made that mark on our group here as a real pro and a real leader,” Blair said. “He’s an exciting guy to have up front.”

In the back end, 6-4, 225-pound Chaz Reddekopp played with Orlando and Allen last season, and young prospect Victor Hadfield is the grandson of former NHL star Vic Hadfield, who was part of the New York Rangers’ famous “Goal-a-Game” line with center Jean Ratelle and right wing Rod Gilbert in the 1970s.

Patrick Holway, 6-5 and 220 pounds, was drafted by the Detroit Red Wings in 2015 before choosing to play college hockey, and played briefly in the AHL last season. Hershey Bears’ signees Macoy Erkamps and Jordan Subban are currently with the Stingrays.

“That’s exciting for us, because I think to build from the back end is more important than ever, and we really like what we have,” Blair said.

Lowcountry Mayors discuss COVID-19 recovery, business and economic growth moving forward

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Lowcountry Mayors discussed COVID-19 recovery efforts while addressing plans for economic and business growth on Thursday at the Charleston Business Journal’s annual Business Expo. Mayors from Summerville, Mount Pleasant, Goose Creek, North Charleston and the City of Charleston all participated in the round table discussion.The mayors say navigating the past year was a challenge but recovery has been fast individually and as a group. Some focus for the leaders remains on recovery while also ...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Lowcountry Mayors discussed COVID-19 recovery efforts while addressing plans for economic and business growth on Thursday at the Charleston Business Journal’s annual Business Expo. Mayors from Summerville, Mount Pleasant, Goose Creek, North Charleston and the City of Charleston all participated in the round table discussion.

The mayors say navigating the past year was a challenge but recovery has been fast individually and as a group. Some focus for the leaders remains on recovery while also addressing things such as housing, workforce stability and regional development.

During the more than hour roundtable, City of Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg, North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey, Mount Pleasant Mayor Will Haynie, Summerville Mayor Ricky Waring and Goose Creek Mayor Greg Habib discussed the various challenges and plans moving forward.

“No it has been a challenging time,” says Mayor Tecklenburg.

In North Charleston, Mayor Summey says as of late “it’s been business as usual,” saying the city has seen a “faster than expected” recovery from the pandemic.

Mount Pleasant Mayor Will Haynie noted the group’s collective efforts as crucial to get through COVID-19. “Nothing brought us closer together than dealing with this pandemic,” says Mayor Haynie.

The mayors shared mixed feelings at the Charleston Regional Business Journal Expo at the North Charleston Coliseum and Performing Arts Center.

The five mayors reflected on the challenges of COVID-19 each of their municipalities faced in front of hundreds of business owners before turning to what they hope comes next.

“We kept things safer than most places in the state and most places in the country through cooperative efforts of local elected officials,” says Mayor Tecklenburg.

Economic improvements, increasing affordable housing and adding higher paid jobs are all goals going forward for the municipalities and regional development experts. The group of mayors say it’s also important to be on the same page as community business leaders.

“It’s important that they understand we have the same goals,” says Mayor Summey. “Small business is the backbone of America, always has been, always will be.”

The Charleston Regional Development Alliance has added 50,000 jobs to the area over the last decade and is looking to add more to the number. Mount Pleasant Mayor Will Haynie says it’s a vital focus for the municipalities.

“We’ve had all the residential growth we can handle over the last decade,” says Mayor Haynie. “We need to grow our economy and we need to do it in a smart way that protects our quality of life but gives high paying jobs in the town.”

Local leaders and hundreds of businesses and entrepreneurs are hopeful their efforts and conversations will better prepare the Lowcountry and it’s economy for years of future growth.

“And I think our economy is really set to take off,” says Mayor Tecklenburg.

The Charleston Regional Development Alliance says attention to things like housing and livability remain critical. They expect the regions population to top one million people by the year 2031.

South Carolina gets its first contestant on ‘The Bachelorette’ in years. Who is he?

South Carolina’s drought of love and heartbreak on one of the most prominent dating shows in America has finally come to an end. But will the contestant from the Palmetto State last more than one episode?Alec Thompson, a 29-year-old civil engineer who lives North Charleston, is one of 30 men vying for ...

South Carolina’s drought of love and heartbreak on one of the most prominent dating shows in America has finally come to an end. But will the contestant from the Palmetto State last more than one episode?

Alec Thompson, a 29-year-old civil engineer who lives North Charleston, is one of 30 men vying for Michelle Young’s heart on this season of ”The Bachelorette” on ABC. He is originally from Forest, Virginia. The season premieres Oct. 19. and includes Clint Eastwood’s grandson as one of the other contestants.

Thompson is the first reality TV lover from South Carolina to compete on the “Bachelor” or “Bachelorette” since 2018, when a woman from Columbia and another from Belton competed for the attention of bachelor Arie Luyendyk.

Like many on the show, Thompson’s show bio online says “he is not here to waste anyone’s time.” Does that mean he’s here for “the right reasons?” We shall see as time goes on.

Here’s his love-filled bio from ABC:

Alec lives to make the most out of every day. After his first marriage ended, Alec learned a lot about the value of commitment and what it takes to truly make love last, so he is not here to waste anyone’s time. He is dependable, emotionally intelligent and values integrity above all else. Alec is hoping to find a woman who appreciates how much his career means to him but will also make him want to be sentimental and bring out the fun side of him. He is true a believer in that old-school, head-over-heels unconditional type of love and is ready to find that with the beautiful Michelle.

ABC also provided some fun facts about Alec, including that he “loves to read GQ Magazine” (a very manly choice) and that his favorite breakfast food is “cottage cheese.” (Maybe he hasn’t discovered shrimp and grits since moving to South Carolina.)

He also thinks bowling makes for a bad date, in case anyone was wondering.

Will we see South Carolina locales on this season of “The Bachelorette”? Hilton Head and Bluffton made a cameo in 2017. If Thompson makes it all the way to hometown dates, then the answer is maybe. But thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, the past three seasons of the show have all been filmed in quarantine. Though, there is a near guarantee that the Palmetto State will get brought up at some point in Thompson’s “journey.”

This story was originally published September 29, 2021 2:40 PM.

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