SEO Company in Daniel Island SC

If you are a business owner, there’s probably a good chance that you have asked yourself this question before. It’s a question that many entrepreneurs ask, and for good reason.

According to a recent study, the first five organic search results on Google account for about 67% of all website clicks. With more than 2.3 trillion Google searches in 2019 alone, it has become clear that if customers can’t find your website online, you’re missing out on a huge opportunity to grow your business.

The good news is, with a trustworthy SEO company in Charleston on your side and an effective SEO campaign, your website can show up on the first page of a Google search. The bad news is, many “SEO agencies” offering such services provide clients with outdated, a la carte options at ridiculous prices – and good luck getting them on the phone if you have a question that needs answering.

Unlike some of our competitors, mediocre customer service and ineffective digital marketing strategies aren’t in our digital DNA.

Our innovative, all-inclusive SEO patented technology and services work together to form a digital marketing machine, unlike anything on the market. We call it Local Magic®.

What local SEO services in Daniel Island can you expect? Keep reading to find out.

A Guide to Google My Business

Comprehensive Link Building

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Most veteran SEO professionals agree that one of the most important signals that Google uses to rank websites is backlinks. Backlinking is essentially a link that is created when one website links to another. According to recent statistics, 91% of webpages that don’t get organic traffic are because they don’t have any backlinks. Mr. Marketing solves this problem for you through comprehensive backlinking techniques, which adds authority to your website over time so that Google recognizes your website as trustworthy in your industry.

Online Review Management

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Positive online reviews can be incredibly beneficial for your business. 93% of online shoppers say that online reviews play a part in their purchasing decisions. The problem is, many business owners don’t have the time to request online reviews from happy clients, manage those reviews, or display them on their company’s website.

That’s where Mr. Marketing’s Review Manager comes in. Review Manager is the world’s first comprehensive reputation management system, allowing you to get more from your reviews. With Review Manager, you have the ability to request reviews via SMS and Email, track pending review requests, and even publish your most favorable reviews right to your website, with a few taps on your phone.

Website Optimization

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As local SEO consultants in Daniel Island, we see a lot of good-looking websites. While a website might be attractive on the surface, it needs to be optimized on the backend for it to have a better chance of showing up in a Google search. Our team of skilled web developers will optimize your website both on the surface and “under the hood”, so that your business gets noticed by customers who are already looking for the products or services you sell.

Website Hosting & Updates

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To make life a little easier, we are happy to host your website on our servers, so you don’t have to hunt down a separate hosting service. If you have updates that need to be applied to your website, we will handle the heavy lifting for you. We even implement security measures to prevent hackers from accessing your data.

Google Ads Management

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Here’s a fact you might not know – Google controls more about 71% of the search engine market. If you want customers to find your business online, you need to show up in Google searches. As part of a comprehensive digital marketing strategy in Daniel Island available from Mr. Marketing, Google Ads can be an excellent wayfor new clients to discover your business both on mobile devices and on desktops. Much like online reviews, however, managing a Google Ads campaign can be burdensome and time consuming for busy entrepreneurs. Our team will work closely with you to figure out the best ways to use Google Ads to your businesses’ advantage so that you can focus on day-to-day tasks while we grow your presence online.

Does Your Local SEO Company in Daniel Island Care?

At Mr. Marketing, we really do care about your businesses’ success. Many local SEO consultants in Daniel Island only care about their profits, but that’s not a mantra that we agree with at Mr. Marketing. For that reason, we also include monthly digital business coaching as part of our Local Magic package. That way, your knowledge of digital marketing grows alongside your businesses’ website rankings.

When We Say All-Inclusive, We Mean It

Believe it or not, you get even more customized SEO services in Daniel Island than those we listed above. While you may certainly pick and choose which digital marketing services work best for your unique situation, with our Local Magic package, you also gain access to:

  • Conversion Optimization
  • Programmatic Ad Management
  • Advertising Landing Page Development
  • Google My Business Management

So, what’s the next step? We encourage you to reach out to our office or fill out the submission form on our website to get started. Once we understand your goals and business needs, we’ll get to work right away, forming a custom marketing strategy for you. Before you know it, your phone will begin ringing, your reviews will start to pour in, your online connections will grow, and your website traffic will explode with interested clients looking to buy your products or services.

Latest News in Daniel Island

Pirates Outlast Talented Field to Win Daniel Island Intercollegiate

CHARLESTON, S.C. – Junior Wenliang Xie (Zhaoqing, China) was the individual runner-up and Andres Acevedo (San Antonio) notched a top-10 finish lifting the Seton Hall men's golf team to the team title of the highly-competitive Daniel Island Intercollegiate on Monday.Playing in a talented field that...

CHARLESTON, S.C. – Junior Wenliang Xie (Zhaoqing, China) was the individual runner-up and Andres Acevedo (San Antonio) notched a top-10 finish lifting the Seton Hall men's golf team to the team title of the highly-competitive Daniel Island Intercollegiate on Monday.

Playing in a talented field that included a pair of top-50 competitors, Virginia (20) and Florida State (48), The Hall led wire-to-wire to claim its first tournament title since the Princeton Invitational in 2017.

The Pirates led the large field of 20 teams with a 6-under-par, 282-282-294-858, besting second-place South Carolina by four strokes. It is Seton Hall's 15th sub-par tournament all-time and its 858 is tied for the fourth-lowest par-72, three-round score in program history.

Xie was as consistent as he was brilliant in Charleston. The junior had four birdies and 11 pars on Monday in route to his third consecutive 1-under-par, 71. Xie finished the three-round event tied for second place among 104 individual golfers with a 3-under-par, 71-71-71-213, just one stroke behind the individual champion, Charleston's Nevill Ruiter. It's his second career sub-par tournament and top-10 finish.

Acevedo had three more birdies in the final round to help him collect a 2-over-par, 74. For the tournament, he tied for 10th with an even-par, 72-70-74-216. It's Acevedo's third career top-10 finish and his second this fall.

Gregor Tait (Martlesham Heath, England) finished his stellar tournament with a 5-over-par, 76, in round three. The graduate student ended the event with a 2-over-par, 71-71-76-218, tying for 16th place overall.

Sophomore Wanxi Sun (Danville, Calif.) helped get the Pirates through the finish line with 15 pars in round three on his way to a 1-over-par, 73. Sun finished the tournament only one stroke behind Tait with a 3-over-par, 68-78-73-219. He tied for 21st place among all individuals.

Senior Deven Ramachandran (San Rafael, Calif.) had a 4-over-par, 76, on Monday. He finished the tournament with a 13-over-par, 83-70-76-229.

Competing as an individual, Ian Lee (Johor, Malaysia) closed out his tournament on Monday with a 6-over-par, 78. He finishes the three-round event with a consistent 17-over-par, 77-78-78-233.

Tournament Details: 2021 DANIEL ISLAND INTERCOLLEGIATE Host: Charleston Southern University Location: Charleston, S.C. Course: Ralston Creek Course Course Vitals: Par-72, 7,446 yards Dates: October 31-November 1, 2021 The Course: As one of the top private golf clubs in Charleston, SC, the Daniel Island Club features the country's only private pairing of golf courses designed by Tom Fazio and Rees Jones playing out of the same clubhouse. Both nationally ranked courses are perfectly integrated into the breathtaking Lowcountry landscape and the country club neighborhood of Daniel Island Park.

Against a stunning backdrop of natural saltwater marsh and tidal creek vistas, acclaimed golf course architect Rees Jones has designed a true low country classic. Ralston Creek, Daniel Island's second 18-hole masterpiece, is a par 72 course playing 7,446 yards from the championship tees.

The Field: In addition to Seton Hall and host Charleston Southern, the large field included 18 other teams including Campbell, College of Charleston, Eastern Kentucky, Florida State, Francis Marion, Gardner-Webb, High Point, Jacksonville State, Lehigh, Presbyterian, Purdue Fort Wayne, South Carolina, USC Aiken, USC Upstate, VCU, Virginia, Western Carolina and Winthrop.

Schedule: The field will play two continuous rounds (36 holes) beginning with an 8:15 a.m. shotgun start on Sunday, and one final round on Monday.

Up Next: This completes the 2021 fall season for Seton Hall. The Pirates will be back in action when it opens the spring season at the Loyola Intercollegiate in Goodyear, Ariz., Feb. 20-22.

2021 DANIEL ISLAND INTERCOLLEGIATE - Team Scores
Pos.PlayerR1R2R3TOTALPAR
2South Carolina289282291862-2
5Virginia291281298870+6
6Campbell294288290872+8
9Western Carolina300291297888+24
10Francis Marion297289305891+27
11Charleston Southern301290301892+28
14Wnthrop297303305905+41
15Gardner-Webb297299313909+45
16Lehigh305298309912+48
18Eastern Kentucky309310312931+67
20Presbyterian305306324935+71
2021 DANIEL ISLAND INTERCOLLEGIATE - Seton Hall Individual Scores

Meeting Notes - November 4, 2021

These are the issues coming before various City of Charleston boards and committees and the review results specific to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. All meetings are open for public comment except the Technical Review Committee (TRC) meetings. Learn more online at charleston-sc.gov/AgendaCenter/.Date: Nov. 4A subdivision concept plan for Cainhoy - Del Webb at Clements Ferry Road and Cainhoy Road (fourth review). The site is a 585.3-acre site plan for a major subdivision that includes 1,094 lots and units. The owner is Cai...

These are the issues coming before various City of Charleston boards and committees and the review results specific to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. All meetings are open for public comment except the Technical Review Committee (TRC) meetings. Learn more online at charleston-sc.gov/AgendaCenter/.

Date: Nov. 4

A subdivision concept plan for Cainhoy - Del Webb at Clements Ferry Road and Cainhoy Road (fourth review). The site is a 585.3-acre site plan for a major subdivision that includes 1,094 lots and units. The owner is Cainhoy Land & Timber. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Will Cox, [email protected].

Date: Oct. 21

• A site plan for Parcel K Office & Parking at 2000 Daniel Island Drive (pre-app). This is a 36.9-acre site plan that would require the demolition of an existing parking lot and infrastructure, upfit of existing office building, new parking, and parking infrastructure. The owner is Holder Properties. The applicant is SeamonWhiteside. Contact: Virginia Skidmore, [email protected]. Results: Revise and submit to TRC.

• A subdivision concept plan for Cainhoy - Del Webb at Clements Ferry Road and Cainhoy Road (third review). The site is a 585.3-acre site plan for a major subdivision that would include 1,094 lots and units. The owner is Cainhoy Land & Timber. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Will Cox, [email protected]. Results: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

Date: Oct. 28

• Site plan for Coastal Kids Dental — Point Hope at 122 Renaissance Drive, Cainhoy (third review). This is a 0.5 acre, pad-ready site for the construction of a dental office. The owner is Coastal Kids Dental (Jacob Driggers, a DI resident). The applicant is Earthsource Engineering. Contact: Vince Sottile, [email protected]. Architect: Loring Design Group (Florida). Landscape architect: Outdoor Spatial Design, LLC. Surveyor: Parker Land Surveying. Results: Pending final documentation. Once approved, submit Site Plan to Zoning for stamping.

• A site plan for Project Throughput at Charleston Regional Parkway in Cainhoy (second review). This is a 172-acre site plan that calls for a new container handling and storage facility. The owner is South Carolina Ports Authority. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Scott Greene, [email protected]. Results: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

• A site plan for Woodfield Daniel Island 3 at 225 Benefitfocus Way on Daniel Island (pre-app). This is a 6-acre site plan that calls for a 175-unit multifamily development. The owner is DIEC III LLC, DIEC IV LLC. The applicant is SeamonWhiteside. Contact: Hampton Young, [email protected]. Results: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

• A site plan for Governor’s Cay Amenity at 808 King Oaks Court on Cainhoy (first review). This is an 8.06-acre site plan that calls for a pool, bathrooms and a pavilion to serve the existing townhome community, The owner is Lennar Carolinas, LLC. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Jason Hutchinson, [email protected]. Results: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

• Berkeley County Council conducts its regularly scheduled meetings on the fourth Monday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Berkeley County Administration Building, 1003 Highway 52, Moncks Corner.

• Berkeley County Board of Education meetings are held twice each month. The second meeting of each month includes special recognitions of students, employees and community members. Executive Committee meets at 5:30 p.m.; meeting starts at 6:30 p.m.

• Charleston City Council conducts its meetings on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month at 5 p.m.

Meeting Notes - November 11, 2021

These are the issues coming before various City of Charleston boards and committees and the review results specific to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. All meetings are open for public comment except the Technical Review Committee (TRC) meetings. Learn more online at charleston-sc.gov/AgendaCenter/.Date: Nov. 18A site plan for Abbington Charleston at 2101 Clements Ferry Road on Cainhoy (first review).This is a 7-acre plat for an affordable housing development with 90 apartment units spread across 10 residential buildi...

These are the issues coming before various City of Charleston boards and committees and the review results specific to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. All meetings are open for public comment except the Technical Review Committee (TRC) meetings. Learn more online at charleston-sc.gov/AgendaCenter/.

Date: Nov. 18

A site plan for Abbington Charleston at 2101 Clements Ferry Road on Cainhoy (first review).

This is a 7-acre plat for an affordable housing development with 90 apartment units spread across 10 residential buildings with clubhouse. The owner is Wando Medical Park, LLC. The applicant is Abbington Charleston LP. Contact: Matt Monroe,

Date: Nov. 18

A road construction plan for Cainhoy First Light Phase 2, a major subdivision plan at Hopewell Drive on Cainhoy (fourth review).

This is a 46.9-acre plat road construction plan for a single-family residential subdivision. The owner is Cainhoy Lumber and Timber, LLC. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Will Cox, [email protected].

Date: Nov. 18

A site plan for Davis Daniel Island Apartments at Parkline Avenue on Daniel Island (first review).

This is a 5-acre plat for a multi-family development with 242 units. The apartment building is planned to be four stories tall with a wraparound parking deck. The owner is Davis Development. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Brian Riley, [email protected].

Date: Nov. 18

A road construction plan for the Marshes at Daniel Island Phases 1A & 1B, a major subdivision at 144 Fairbanks Drive on Daniel Island (seventh review).

This is a 16.78-acre plat for road construction plans on a 56-lot subdivision. The owner is SM Charleston, LLC. The applicant is SeamonWhiteside. Contact: Zim Fant, [email protected].

Date: Nov. 4

A subdivision concept plan for Cainhoy - Del Webb at Clements Ferry Road and Cainhoy Road (fourth review).

The site is a 585.3-acre site plan for a major subdivision that would include 1,094 lots and units. The owner is Cainhoy Land & Timber. The applicant is Thomas & Hutton. Contact: Will Cox, [email protected].

Results: Pending final documentation. Once resolved, proceed to Planning Commission.

• Berkeley County Council conducts its regularly scheduled meetings on the fourth Monday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Berkeley County Administration Building, 1003 Highway 52, Moncks Corner.

• Berkeley County Board of Education meetings are held twice each month. The second meeting of each month includes special recognitions of students, employees and community members. Executive Committee meets at 5:30 p.m.; meeting starts at 6:30 p.m.

• Charleston City Council conducts its meetings on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month at 5 p.m.

News Briefs - November 25, 2021

2021 Angel charities worthy of contributionEach year, South Carolina Secretary of State Mark Hammond recognizes worthy nonprofits that exemplify charitable giving in South Carolina. For 2021, there were 15 Angel charities chosen.The charities were selected by review of financial reports submitted annually to the Secretary of State’s Office, as well as by nominations from the public. To be selected, the charity must have devoted 80% or more of its total expenditures to charitable programs; must have been i...

2021 Angel charities worthy of contribution

Each year, South Carolina Secretary of State Mark Hammond recognizes worthy nonprofits that exemplify charitable giving in South Carolina. For 2021, there were 15 Angel charities chosen.

The charities were selected by review of financial reports submitted annually to the Secretary of State’s Office, as well as by nominations from the public. To be selected, the charity must have devoted 80% or more of its total expenditures to charitable programs; must have been in existence for three or more years; must make good use of volunteer services; must receive minimal funding from grants; must have a significant presence in South Carolina; and the charity must be in compliance with the South Carolina Solicitation of

Charitable Funds Act. Each year the Secretary of State’s Office attempts to showcase organizations with diverse missions from several areas around the state.

For more information, call the Division of Public Charities at 1-888-CHARITI (242-7484) or send an email to [email protected].

If donors have concerns about a charitable organization, professional fundraiser, or raffle, they can file a confidential complaint with the Secretary of State’s Office by using the online Charitable Solicitation Complaint Form.

The Angel charities recognized, with the percentage of their expenditures that went toward their program services, are listed below. Those South Carolina organizations recognized are listed in alphabetical order and are not ranked by the Secretary of State.

• All 4 Paws, Pawleys Island - 89.9%

• Center for Developmental Services, Greenville - 91.5%

• Kershaw Area Resource Exchange Inc., Kershaw - 96.8%

• Kids On Point Inc., Charleston - 86.8%

• Our Lady of Mercy Community Outreach Services, Johns Island - 86.4%

• Upstate Warrior Solution Inc., Greenville - 90.9%

Tourism Day to raise funds for homelessness prevention nonprofit

The Charleston Tour Association (CTA) will support neighbors in need this holiday season by hosting its first Tourism Day. On Saturday, Dec. 4, participating tourism-related businesses, such as tour companies and guides and historical museums, will donate 10% of their revenue to One80 Place. The association’s goal is to donate $3,000 to this important local nonprofit.

One80 Place is the largest provider of homeless services for families, children, men, and veterans in the Lowcountry. They served 478 veterans in fiscal year 2021 and saw an increase in need for housing services for women and children. “When board members of the Charleston Tour Association learned this, we decided to do something to help,” said Cainhoy peninsula resident Lee Ann Bain, CTA president. “Our Tourism Day fundraiser is an opportunity for the local tourism industry to give back to the community and a chance for people to learn more about Charleston history while supporting a worthy cause.”

One80 Place provides services in the areas of housing, hunger, employment, health care, and legal aid. Everything they do is grounded in the core belief that everyone deserves a home.

Approximately 22 tour companies and guides will take part in Tourism Day. To see the complete list of participants and book your tour, go to tourcharleston.org/tourism-day-2021/.

Historic treasures tell story of DI’s Native American heritage

They may have called Daniel Island home hundreds and even thousands of years ago, but you can still spot evidence of their existence today.An oyster shell midden on the banks of the Wando River.A piece of clay pottery jutting out from the sand along the coastline at low tide.A modern roadway that traces an ancient trading route.An arrowhead buried beneath layers of soil.Native Americans were the first to lay claim to this land. Archaeologist Dr. Eric Poplin, vice president of Brockington & Associates, a...

They may have called Daniel Island home hundreds and even thousands of years ago, but you can still spot evidence of their existence today.

An oyster shell midden on the banks of the Wando River.

A piece of clay pottery jutting out from the sand along the coastline at low tide.

A modern roadway that traces an ancient trading route.

An arrowhead buried beneath layers of soil.

Native Americans were the first to lay claim to this land. Archaeologist Dr. Eric Poplin, vice president of Brockington & Associates, an industry leader in cultural resources management, has been studying Daniel Island’s history for more than 30 years.

“I think the most important thing that our research revealed concerning the Native Americans who lived on Daniel Island and around Charleston Harbor is their adaptability, the way they utilized so much of their environment and surroundings to maintain themselves, their families, their communities, and at times, even larger social groups,” Poplin said. “... These people understood how to survive very well in this place where we live today. This demonstrates the abilities of people to make fruitful lives, much more than just surviving, in a most efficient and commodious manner.”

November has been designated as Native American Heritage Month, a time to remember the rich ancestry and traditions of a people known for their strength, resilience, and immeasurable contributions to the societies in which they lived. Daniel Island’s ties to Native Americans are well documented. The island was once known as Ittiwan or Etiwan Island, a tribute to the tribe that settled in the area centuries ago.

“Native American artifacts occur in fairly large quantities along the margins of the island, with several large concentrations that likely reflect longer term occupations — like villages or farmsteads, particularly during the 1400s-1600s,” Poplin noted. “One of these sites lies near the Volvo Cup Tennis Center (now the Credit One Stadium) and the I-526 Wando River bridge and the other lies to the north on Ralston Creek. However, there is evidence that people have been visiting and spending some time on Daniel Island for the last 13,000 years.”

Former Daniel Island resident Mike Dahlman, co-founder of the Daniel Island Historical Society, described Native American occupation of the island in the book “Daniel Island,” which he co-authored with his son, Michael K. Dahlman Jr.

According to the book, nearly every excavated site has revealed Native American relics, including some of the oldest ceramics found anywhere in North America. “Archaeologists have uncovered arrowheads that date from 10,000 years ago, along with pottery shards that indicate Etiwan Island ... was an important living area from at least 2500 B.C.,” Dahlman wrote.

“A place like Daniel Island would have had an abundant food supply, fishing access, good climate, and the proximity to water was important for everything from transit and trade, to spiritual significance and ritual,” said Daniel Island Historical Society President Jessica Knuff, who is of Cherokee/Pee Dee descent and serves as a board member for the U.S. Department of State’s Native American Foreign Affairs Council. “Many of the reasons people lived on Daniel Island thousands of years ago may be very similar to why we chose to live here now.”

Although not much is known about the Etiwan Tribe specifically, due to the fact that they had no written language, they likely shared many of the common beliefs and cultural practices of neighboring Lowcountry tribes.

“The Etiwan had a Muskogean-based language, so they most likely shared similar cultural connections to the nearby Cusso, Kusso-Natchez, Kiawah, Stono and Yemassee tribes,” Knuff continued. “The beliefs and practices of the historic Etiwan tribe would have morphed over the years with influence from Edisto, Catawba and Cherokee cultures as colonial pressure to move inland brought various Native cultures into settlement towns for survival. South Carolina had a robust Native trading path running directly through the state from the coast to the mountains, so Carolina tribes shared many common cultural influences through travel and trade.”

As part of their 2004 investigation of the Ralston Creek site in what is now Daniel Island Park, Poplin and his team made a significant discovery – a Native American burial.

“This person was buried near one of the Ashley phase houses that once stood on the site,” Poplin noted. “Likely sometime between AD 1570 and 1650. Encountering human remains is always sobering and exciting. So much of what we do as archaeologists involves just pieces of refuse that people used but left behind. We do not deal with actual people that often, but when we do, it is always in the most respectful and sensitive manner possible.”

The remains were ultimately relocated in a manner consistent with Native American traditions. “A Catawba Shaman, or spiritual leader, was present when the remains were removed and reburied on Daniel Island in an area that will not be developed,” Dahlman wrote.

“Special care was taken to retain the geographical alignment of the body.”

It is that tradition and many others that defined Native American life — and it is hoped that through initiatives like Native American Heritage Month their contributions will continue to be recognized.

“South Carolina’s role in shaping Native American culture, religion and existing tribal structures cannot be understated,” Knuff added. “Because South Carolina was an early contact state, much of this influence was due to the slave trade. Spanish and French exploration prior to the arrival of English settlers resulted in diminished numbers of Lowcountry Natives, due to both disease and slavery. Early Carolina settlers arriving from Barbados depended on slave labor for the plantation-style agricultural systems they replicated in the Lowcountry.”

In fact, significant numbers of Native Americans were captured and used in slavery for the purposes of farming, making “Charles Towne” the epicenter of the American Indian Slave Trade, according to Knuff. It is believed that between 1670 and 1720, more Native American slaves were exported out of Charleston than Africans were imported.

“Many Lowcountry Natives were shipped to the West Indies or elsewhere for profit,” Knuff noted. She said the purpose of the American Indian Slave Trade “was not only profit, but also to break up existing community and political institutions of Native tribes on the East Coast. In South Carolina, some of the tribes that exist today, in their modern form, are descendants of tribal groups that escaped the Lowcountry as a result of these colonial influences.”

Today, many descendants of the Etiwan Tribe live in the Summerville/Carnes Crossroads area and are known as the Wassamasaw Indian Nation and the Wassamasaw Tribe of Varnertown.

Poplin said, “We should never think of Native Americans as living just in the past,” since there are many Native American people living in our communities today. “And not just people from the major tribes that we know about,” he added. “They are still here and trying to maintain their identities as Native Americans.”

In a 2019 presentation for the Daniel Island Historical Society, Knuff encouraged all community members to ponder some important questions.

“Whose land do you live on? What do/did they call themselves? What was done to them? How do you benefit from that? What are they doing now? If you can’t answer these questions, ask yourself why — and then find out.”

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