SEO Company in Hilton Head Island, SC

If you are a business owner, there's probably a good chance that you have asked yourself this question before. It's a question that many entrepreneurs ask, and for good reason.

According to a recent study, the first five organic search results on Google account for about 67% of all website clicks. With more than 2.3 trillion Google searches in 2019 alone, it has become clear that if customers can't find your website online, you're missing out on a huge opportunity to grow your business.

The good news is, with a trustworthy SEO company in Charleston on your side and an effective SEO campaign, your website can show up on the first page of a Google search. The bad news is, many "SEO agencies" offering such services provide clients with outdated, a la carte options at ridiculous prices - and good luck getting them on the phone if you have a question that needs answering.

Unlike some of our competitors, mediocre customer service and ineffective digital marketing strategies aren't in our digital DNA.

Our innovative, all-inclusive SEO patented technology and services work together to form a digital marketing machine, unlike anything on the market. We call it Local Magic®.

What local SEO services in Hilton Head Island can you expect? Keep reading to find out.

 SEO Company Hilton Head Island, SC

Comprehensive Link Building

 SEO Hilton Head Island, SC

Most veteran SEO professionals agree that one of the most important signals that Google uses to rank websites is backlinks. Backlinking is essentially a link that is created when one website links to another. According to recent statistics, 91% of webpages that don't get organic traffic are because they don't have any backlinks. Mr. Marketing solves this problem for you through comprehensive backlinking techniques, which adds authority to your website over time so that Google recognizes your website as trustworthy in your industry.

Online Review Management

 SEO Companies Hilton Head Island, SC

Positive online reviews can be incredibly beneficial for your business. 93% of online shoppers say that online reviews play a part in their purchasing decisions. The problem is, many business owners don't have the time to request online reviews from happy clients, manage those reviews, or display them on their company's website.

That's where Mr. Marketing's Review Manager comes in. Review Manager is the world's first comprehensive reputation management system, allowing you to get more from your reviews. With Review Manager, you have the ability to request reviews via SMS and Email, track pending review requests, and even publish your most favorable reviews right to your website, with a few taps on your phone.

Website Optimization

 SEO Agencies Hilton Head Island, SC

As local SEO consultants in Hilton Head Island, we see a lot of good-looking websites. While a website might be attractive on the surface, it needs to be optimized on the backend for it to have a better chance of showing up in a Google search. Our team of skilled web developers will optimize your website both on the surface and "under the hood", so that your business gets noticed by customers who are already looking for the products or services you sell.

Website Hosting & Updates

 Local SEO Services Hilton Head Island, SC

To make life a little easier, we are happy to host your website on our servers, so you don't have to hunt down a separate hosting service. If you have updates that need to be applied to your website, we will handle the heavy lifting for you. We even implement security measures to prevent hackers from accessing your data.

Google Ads Management

 SEO Firm Hilton Head Island, SC

Here's a fact you might not know - Google controls more about 71% of the search engine market. If you want customers to find your business online, you need to show up in Google searches. As part of a comprehensive digital marketing strategy in Hilton Head Island available from Mr. Marketing, Google Ads can be an excellent wayfor new clients to discover your business both on mobile devices and on desktops. Much like online reviews, however, managing a Google Ads campaign can be burdensome and time consuming for busy entrepreneurs. Our team will work closely with you to figure out the best ways to use Google Ads to your businesses advantage so that you can focus on day-to-day tasks while we grow your presence online.

Does Your Local SEO Company in Hilton Head Island Care?

At Mr. Marketing, we really do care about your businesses success. Many local SEO consultants in Hilton Head Island only care about their profits, but that's not a mantra that we agree with at Mr. Marketing. For that reason, we also include monthly digital business coaching as part of our Local Magic package. That way, your knowledge of digital marketing grows alongside your businesses website rankings.

When We Say All-Inclusive, We Mean It

Believe it or not, you get even more customized SEO services in Hilton Head Island than those we listed above. While you may certainly pick and choose which digital marketing services work best for your unique situation, with our Local Magic package, you also gain access to:

  • Conversion Optimization
  • Programmatic Ad Management
  • Advertising Landing Page Development
  • Google My Business Management

So, what's the next step? We encourage you to reach out to our office or fill out the submission form on our website to get started. Once we understand your goals and business needs, we'll get to work right away, forming a custom marketing strategy for you. Before you know it, your phone will begin ringing, your reviews will start to pour in, your online connections will grow, and your website traffic will explode with interested clients looking to buy your products or services.

Latest News in Hilton Head Island, SC

One tank trip: By ferry or horse, Daufuskie and Hilton Head Island are ample lands to explore

For Savannah Morning NewsIf you’re a local living in Coastal Georgia or South Carolina Lowcountry, when Hilton Head Island comes to mind, likely you think of retired snowbirds, beach lounging, cocktails, fine dining, and of course, golf.Lots of golf.Chances are nature and outdoor adventuring aren’t among the first things you inherently associate with the popular island getaway. But outdoor adventures abound on the island, nearby as well — it’s just a matter of knowing where to find ...

For Savannah Morning News

If you’re a local living in Coastal Georgia or South Carolina Lowcountry, when Hilton Head Island comes to mind, likely you think of retired snowbirds, beach lounging, cocktails, fine dining, and of course, golf.

Lots of golf.

Chances are nature and outdoor adventuring aren’t among the first things you inherently associate with the popular island getaway. But outdoor adventures abound on the island, nearby as well — it’s just a matter of knowing where to find them.

Recent one tank trip:Put 'sibling rivalries' to bed — there's a variety of fun to have in Charleston

Other trip ideas:Augusta Canal provides amazing views, camping and kayaking. Just not in summer.

The Westin Hilton Head Island Resort and Spa offers a couple of unique room packages perfect for locals looking for an early or mid-week break from the nine-to-five grind.

One package includes an alligator wildlife voyage to Sea Pines Forest Preserve with boat captain and naturalist, Anthony Savarese. You’ll take an hour-long narrated tour through the preserve’s lakes and canals, learning about Hilton Head’s natural history as well as getting ample opportunity to see alligators and a range of coastal bird species.

You’ll also get acquainted with the preserve’s walking trails. Be sure to bring binoculars, a field guide or two and pack a picnic lunch because you can easily spend the better part of a day exploring the swamps and pine-shaded paths after the boat tour.

One tank trip:Share an apple with a donkey on the prehistoric grounds of Stallings Island

And if you’ve always wanted to ride a horse on the beach, the Westin has a great partnership with private island community, Haig Point, where you can hop on a ferry, and after a 40-minute boat ride, arrive at Daufuskie Island. There, you just might meet the steed of your dreams.

Twice a day, six days a week, the staff at Daufuskie Trail Rides leads groups of no more than five people to experience the mostly untouched beaches of the island. It’s a lot like summer camp but better because you’ll always be in a small group, easily able to speak to the riders around you, and the pine and palmetto-lined trails lead to some of the most pristine coastline you may ever see.

The only way on or off Daufuskie Island is by boat or helicopter. And so, on a bright, cooler than usual mid-August morning, I arrived at the Haig Point ferry dock to embark on the first leg of my equestrian adventure. But an emergency medical evacuation a few hours earlier had left the regular ferry schedule more than an hour behind.

Not a problem for me and the family I was joining on the day’s horseback ride but a major inconvenience for the collection of 70 women also assembled on the dock scheduled to compete in a golf tournament on Daufuskie.

90 minutes and two boats later, our horse riding crew finally hopped on a ferry along with a slew of workers also headed out. Among them I noted construction guys, a couple school employees, and a chef with a clutch of knives. All of them, like us, now running two hours behind.

But it occurred to me that when it’s all going smoothly, a 40-minute ferry commute is a pretty humane way to start the workday. As we pulled away, an osprey floated in the warming sunlight as a wedge of egrets flew above the pines along the shore. Easing through the No Wake zone, I glimpsed some of the construction workers tucking their chins, arms folded to catch a few extra moments of shuteye. Meanwhile, as we glided forward, dolphins intermittently jumped alongside us.

Once we arrived on Daufuskie, we were quickly ushered into an air-conditioned shuttle and taken about three miles to the horse barn. There, our guides and horses were patiently waiting, and soon enough we were atop them and venturing through the maritime forest.

I was riding with a family of four. The mother, who that day was celebrating her 51st birthday, had recently taken up riding near their home in New Jersey. Her two sons and niece who’d agreed to join, had never ridden before, and it was a treat to watch them quickly gain confidence directing their mounts. By ride’s end the newbie trio had no problem stopping their horses from eating grass along the path and urging them forward.

Unfortunately, we couldn’t ride on the sand because March 15 to October 15 is considered high season with many people wanting to ride, and this time span also overlaps in part with sea turtle nesting season.

So, locals take note: If you want to ride on the beach, book it between October 16 and March 14.

But we got close enough to take in some grand ocean views, and as we rode along, a volunteer turtle patrol happened to find a newly hatched clutch of 12 little loggerheads. They placed them in a bucket for us to have a look before releasing the cute critters into the Atlantic.

Back at the Westin, I snagged a quick nap then headed to View 32, the resort’s outdoor restaurant overlooking the pool and surrounded by levels of wooden terraces appointed with small tables, chaise lounges, umbrellas and covered nooks for two.

The light evening breeze made everything especially lovely. And I was happy to see on the menu a Beyond Meat burger, that, along with salad and small plate of eggplant hummus and pimento cheese dip made for a filling yet light enough dinner to cap off a perfect day of outdoor adventure on Hilton Head Island.

30 years in the pulpit on Hilton Head: ‘Here with a purpose’ at St. Luke’s

Greg Kronz sported the oversized glasses of the day, and a pretty hip beard, when he arrived 30 years ago as the new rector at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church on Hilton Head Island.He and Meredith came with children ages 6, 4 and 1, and can say now they weren’t sure what they were getting into.He played guitar. She sang.He was surprised to be considered for the job because, at 35, he’d never served as a rector.This Sunday morning, Kronz, without the beard but still with a shock of dark hair, will pre...

Greg Kronz sported the oversized glasses of the day, and a pretty hip beard, when he arrived 30 years ago as the new rector at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church on Hilton Head Island.

He and Meredith came with children ages 6, 4 and 1, and can say now they weren’t sure what they were getting into.

He played guitar. She sang.

He was surprised to be considered for the job because, at 35, he’d never served as a rector.

This Sunday morning, Kronz, without the beard but still with a shock of dark hair, will preach his last sermon as head of the 58-year-old church on Pope Avenue, known as St. Luke’s Church following its 2009 break from the Episcopal Church for theological reasons.

He is retiring as one of the island’s longest-serving clergymen ever.

“I believe (God) has called us here with a purpose,” Kronz said in a Packet story introducing him to the community in 1992. “And I don’t know what it means but we’ll work together to find out.”

I asked Greg and Meredith Kronz about that as he sat in a light suit and turned collar in an office stripped of its books and eight filing cabinets of old sermons that got tossed, except for some he may use in a new venture of writing.

Outside the office door is a long line of new boxes full of books belonging to incoming rector Jady Koch and his wife, Liza, and their five young children will now write new chapters for a parish tracing its roots to the founding of this colony.

Because few people see the underbelly of a community as a pastor does, I asked Kronz:

“What did you find out?”

First, they found that Hilton Head is exactly not what it is portrayed to be: It has pain, poverty and suffering.

“We found that this is a place with the need of the gospel of Jesus Christ,” Kronz said.

“We found a church that is an incredible source of ministry so far beyond the walls of the church.

“We found very talented people, and sometimes very troubled people.

“We found that sometimes people are all about retirement and doing what they want to do, and we need to reach them so they have a greater purpose. There’s a lot of loneliness too. A lot of the older people were lonely.”

Kronz arrived saying his role would be “giving people the practical tools to meet their needs and carry out their own ministry. I see it as a shared ministry.”

He leaves saying, “The Lord allowed me to be faithful to that.”

He has overseen five capital campaigns and expansion of the site to take over a former interior decorating business and a law office.

The church initiated and was the original host to the dementia respite organization now known as Memory Matters.

It offered Habitat for Humanity an office and a place to park its truck when the island chapter formed.

It added a family-counseling ministry.

It has a pre-school ministry.

It started the Church Mouse thrift store that last year gave $500,000 to charities.

It participated in a soup kitchen down the street at Holy Family Catholic Church and for a while offered access to toiletries and basic supplies to the homeless.

Its members minister in prisons.

It hosts the Neighborhood Outreach Connection academic program to boost neighborhood children living in poverty.

One member, the late Dr. Rick Vanderslice, and his wife, Joni, founded an orphanage in Tanzania after the doctor went along with Kronz in one of his 13 mission trips to Tanzania.

“It’s about the gospel,” Kronz said, “but it is also about caring for the community.”

The painful part has been the departures.

When St. Luke’s left the Episcopal church along with about a dozen other congregations in coastal South Carolina, Kronz was applauded when he told the congregation “we are still a Christ-centered, biblically-centered church.” But more than 200 members left the fold.

The rift dating to 2003 was apparently settled for good only two weeks ago when the S.C. Supreme Court ruled that St. Luke’s, and others now identifying as Anglicans, did not have to vacate the church property.

Kronz said another wave of people left the island in the recession for economic reasons and more left as young couples could not afford to live on the island.

Add to that the retirement-nature of the island, where Kronz has conducted more than 800 funerals, and you get a cumulative feeling of loss that had him muttering the words of Nehemiah: “Do not grieve, for the joy of the Lord is your strength.”

The Kronzes will not leave the island. They’ll try to see more of their three grandchildren, with another on the way. He will have weekends off for the first time in his life.

They met in his native Pittsburgh. She was working with the Young Life high school ministry, and he was involved in it after switching his major at Pitt from chemical engineering to a religion and philosophy double-major, followed by seminary.

“We have never known each other outside of a shared ministry,” he said.

Back in 1992, Kronz said, “We live in a hurting world that needs healing.”

Thirty years later, after all that work, how is that world looking?

“Worse,” he said.

“Look at the suicides, drug overdoses, cruel people on social media, the division of the nation as a whole, the mass shootings,” he said.

“Is that better?”

But his final words are of hope.

“There’s still a lot of pain and hurt. There’s still a lot of need. My hope is that Hilton Head will continue to be a place where churches are transformative to people’s lives and to the community and beyond the community.

“It is a place blessed with talent, resources and time that people have in retirement. We can have a huge impact by helping people see the opportunities and doing things in His name.

“Secondarily, I hope that people learn to get along.”

This story was originally published September 1, 2022 11:28 AM.

‘Like holding a bronco back’: Pro Disposal charts a path for controlled growth in South Carolina

One of the nation’s fastest-growing counties is also home to a quickly expanding regional hauler with support from multiple veteran investors. Following a recent acquisition, South Carolina’s Pro Disposal is hoping to capitalize on that growth while managing a tight geographic focus.Founded in 2006 by President Alex Cano with just two roll-off containers and one truck, the company is based in Ridgeland, South Carolina. It services customers as far north as Charleston and as far south as Savannah, Georgia.Jeff Kendal...

One of the nation’s fastest-growing counties is also home to a quickly expanding regional hauler with support from multiple veteran investors. Following a recent acquisition, South Carolina’s Pro Disposal is hoping to capitalize on that growth while managing a tight geographic focus.

Founded in 2006 by President Alex Cano with just two roll-off containers and one truck, the company is based in Ridgeland, South Carolina. It services customers as far north as Charleston and as far south as Savannah, Georgia.

Jeff Kendall, managing director at Laurel Mountain Partners, came on as an investor in 2020 and brought in Comerica Bank as a partner. This summer, Ironwood Capital also made an investment in the company to support the acquisitions of Carolina Containers of Beaufort and Barnwell Resources.

Dickson Suit, a partner at Ironwood who already served on Pro’s board prior to the new investment, said that was a “pivotal” move for the company because it brought in new vertical integration opportunities. He described Cano as a “tremendous” operator who was “very customer focused.”

While Pro already owned one transfer station in Beaufort County permitted for 500 tons per day, as well as the Appleton Landfill in Allendale County that is permitted for 21,000 tons per year, the new assets significantly expand its operations and are closer to key markets.

The Carolina Containers transfer station in Jasper County brings in another 500 tons per day of permitted capacity and the Barnwell Resources landfill in Beaufort County is permitted for 156,000 tons per year. The Barnwell site had an estimated 38 years of capacity left in 2021 — more than double the capacity at Appleton — according to the most recent South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control report.

Following the transactions, Kendall estimates that Pro has “roughly quadrupled our sales in two years” while significantly boosting earnings, and is seeing growth of 25% or more per year in every product line. Pro currently has more than 80 trucks offering a range of collection types (subscription residential, front load commercial and roll-off) as well as portable restroom services.

Keep up with the story. Subscribe to the Waste Dive free daily newsletter

In addition to the bigger city markets, Pro is also focused on areas such as Bluffton, Beaufort and Hilton Head in South Carolina. Cano and his investors view local competitors as reasonable in terms of pricing, which has allowed them to sustainably compete in the market.

“We do a lot of work on the islands and the different communities in plantations where we’re the preferred hauler probably in 50% of the communities. We probably have about 70% of Hilton Head island on a subscription basis,” said Cano.

Pro uses split-body trucks for collection on Hilton Head, with recyclables going to a nearby WM MRF. At the moment, Pro doesn’t anticipate investing in its own processing infrastructure.

Jasper County (which includes Hilton Head) was the third fastest-growing county in the U.S. from July 2020 to July 2021 and Cano said this is playing out through volumes.

“It’s a beautiful area for people to come here and retire,” he said. “I think that we definitely benefit on the C&D side, but our goal is to — after the home is built, or while the home is built — get their residential cart to make it more of a permanent transaction. A lot of commercial work is happening too, because all the people moving here need to eat places and they need to go to the doctor.”

This is a textbook cycle often touted by financial analysts and industry competitors about how economic growth is a boon for haulers. Pro’s team said they’re continually investing to make the most of it. Kendall noted the company’s average truck age is around three years old, and as soon as new containers or carts come in they’re often sent out quickly. The company has also a new headquarters, including a truck yard and maintenance shop in Ridgeland, and may add other yards in Charleston or Savannah in the future.

In terms of labor, Cano said the usual recruitment challenges are a factor in his market, but Pro is finding ways to compete with unspecified high-end pay and benefits.

“We’re hiring a lot more of the veterans that are coming from the the larger companies to move over and work with us and we’re growing tremendously in the area.”

Looking ahead, Pro and its investors see potential for more organic growth in its current markets and will be building a bigger sales team. Other acquisitions are also expected, but with a targeted focus.

”We’re not really looking to go way far afield, we’re not going to Pennsylvania or necessarily Florida. Our focuses would be more in the tri-state area — North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia — initially,” said Kendall. “There are a lot of advantages to not being hither and yon, and over the years I’ve learned to prefer staying pretty dense where you are. You want to build high margins, free cash flow.”

While Pro left the door open for a broader expansion, the group repeatedly emphasized that they plan to take a controlled approach to growth — at least for as long as possible.

“This is a little bit like holding a bronco back,” said Kendall, noting at the same time that “we don’t want to lose the flavor of the local, family company.”

Hilton Head, community organizations help Chimney Cove residents facing eviction

The Town of Hilton Head will host a special meeting next week with the island’s community leaders to assist the 300 tenants being evicted from the Chimney Cove apartment complex.The town Council called a special meeting set for 9 a.m. Sept. 6 in response to the evictions. Community leaders and organizations that have assisted Chimney Cove residents will brainstorm short- and long-term solutions to finding homes for the evicted tenants, many of whom are low-income and only speak Spanish.And the Beaufort County School Distr...

The Town of Hilton Head will host a special meeting next week with the island’s community leaders to assist the 300 tenants being evicted from the Chimney Cove apartment complex.

The town Council called a special meeting set for 9 a.m. Sept. 6 in response to the evictions. Community leaders and organizations that have assisted Chimney Cove residents will brainstorm short- and long-term solutions to finding homes for the evicted tenants, many of whom are low-income and only speak Spanish.

And the Beaufort County School District announced it will parents to keep their children enrolled in Hilton Head schools and provide transportation even if they move off the island.

Town officials have been monitoring the situation, according to an Aug. 26 statement from Mayor John McCann.

Chimney Cove, located at 839 William Hilton Parkway, was one of the few remaining affordable housing options on Hilton Head. With the change of ownership, many of the mostly Hispanic residents are faced with having to move off the island entirely, quit their jobs on Hilton Head or switch their kids’ schools just three weeks into the start of the school year.

Several organizations have already started arranging relief, according to the statement from McCann. Lowcountry Legal Volunteers, a nonprofit that provides legal advice to those who otherwise couldn’t afford it, is helping residents understand their options.

The Beaufort County School District is offering counseling for the 76 children affected by the evictions, according to the statement, and an unnamed person is allowing one of the families to live in his short-term rental for the same $1,400 monthly rate they paid at Chimney Cove.

Since the residents of Chimney Cove received eviction notices on Aug. 12, following the sale of the property, many have scrambled to find new housing on the island. Some were told to leave as early as Sept. 12, threatened with sheriff’s department involvement if they were not out by then.

Christ Lutheran Church, located next door to the apartment complex, and the Deep Well Project have partnered to accept monetary donations for relocation costs, storage rentals and deposits for new apartments.

“We are trying to find temporary housing for as many people as possible,” said Sandy Gilles of the Deep Well Project.

About 90 adults and children attended a meeting at the church Sunday night to give their information to representatives from Deep Well Project and Lowcountry Legal Volunteers as well as several other local community organizations.

Residents and their families, including children in pajama pants who were ready for bedtime, listened closely to the services being offered, first in English, then in Spanish.

“We know it’s such a stressful time for all of you and we are praying and wish the best of all of you,” Christ Lutheran Church Pastor June Wilkins said.

Wilkins said she has been in touch with the owner of the property, Sam Johal, and announced at the meeting that residents with a Sept. 12 move-out date would be getting their deposits back. Johal declined a request for comment from the Island Packet and Beaufort Gazette.

Other local organizations at the meeting offered what they could to try and help

Lowcountry Gullah is offering to connect residents with Hilton Head Gullah families who own land for rent so that residents who are in a position to buy a trailer may park them there, said representative Luana Graves Sellers. Volunteers in Medicine will have medical services available Monday and Wednesday afternoons for residents who are not already patients at the free clinic, Executive Director Dr. John Newman said.

Yanina Sarli Rotti, a student services specialist with the school district, announced that Superintendent Frank Rodriguez would allow parents to keep their children enrolled in Hilton Head schools and provide transportation even if they move off the island via the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, a federal law that ensures equal access to education and resources for students experiencing homelessness.

By keeping students at their schools, the school district hopes to create some sort of “stability.”

“We want you to know we are here for you,” Sarli Rotti said. “We are trying to make this less painful and stressful when it comes to the children’s education. We’re here to help.”

This story was originally published August 29, 2022 1:22 PM.

Looking for a bicycle on the beach? Here are 5 of the top-rated rental shops on Hilton Head

With summer coming to an end and school starting back up, families are opting for the simplest ways to make their end-of-summer vacations as stress-free as possible.Not wanting to ship or drag your bicycle across the country or state lines? Bringing your bicycle on vacation can be expensive, a hassle and sometimes even dangerous.Renting a bicycle for your family members following your arrival to the island can be much more stress-free than the alternative. With so many options for rental companies on the island, it can be diffi...

With summer coming to an end and school starting back up, families are opting for the simplest ways to make their end-of-summer vacations as stress-free as possible.

Not wanting to ship or drag your bicycle across the country or state lines? Bringing your bicycle on vacation can be expensive, a hassle and sometimes even dangerous.

Renting a bicycle for your family members following your arrival to the island can be much more stress-free than the alternative. With so many options for rental companies on the island, it can be difficult to make a decision when deciding which company to choose. Whether your selection is based on vicinity, word-of-mouth or affordability, it’s important to know your options.

Here are the five top-rated bicycle rental companies on Hilton Head Island based on Google reviews, each with more than a 4.5 ranking and hundreds of reviews.

Rating: 5.0 out of 5.0 (364 reviews)

Cross Island Bike Rental is a family run business on Hilton Head Island that promises a relaxing rental process, great equipment and around-the-clock customer service. Located toward the island’s southern end, this rental company has a variety of bicycle and attachment options to choose from in addition to beach chairs and umbrella rentals. Cross Island Bike Rental can be found at 13 Executive Park Road, Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 and reached at 843-384-7371.

Rating: 5.0 out of 5.0 (254 reviews)

Hilton Head E-Bike Rental is an E-bike rental company on the south end of the island that caters to the rising popularity of E-bikes. Prioritizing safety, the company has capped the maximum speed of their electric bicycles at under 20 mph. The speed was chosen as it can be attained by pedaling a bicycle, yet is generally not reached by renters on their leisurely rides throughout any of Hilton Head’s numerous bike trails. The company can be found at 115 Arrow Road # 15, Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 and reached at (843) 603-5657.

Rating: 4.9 out of 5.0 (341 reviews)

Island Life Bike Rentals is a rental company on the island that specializes in pedal bikes, electric bikes, beach chairs and umbrella rentals for anyone on Hilton Head Island. According to the business, bicycle deliveries from the company are available to the island communities of Sea Pines, Palmetto Dunes, Shipyard, North Forest Beach, South Forest Beach, the Coligny Beach area, and areas between the south end and Folly Field. Island Life Bike Rentals is located on the south end of the island at 36 South Forest Beach Drive, Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 between Coligny Beach and Alder Lane beach access points. They can be reached at 843-384-1430.

Rating: 4.7 out of 5.0 (291 reviews)

Hilton Head Outfitters & Bike Rentals is a company on the island that covers a plethora of outdoor activities. In addition to bike and electric bike rentals, they offer beach chairs and beach umbrella rentals, jogging and wagon stroller rentals, beach wheelchair rentals, surfboard rentals and cornhole board rentals. Hilton Head Outfitters & Bike Rentals can be found at 80 Queens Folly Road, Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 and can be reached at 866-380-1783.

Rating: 4.7 out of 5.0 (126 reviews)

Hilton Head Bicycle Company has been providing locals and the island’s visitors with rental bicycles, new bicycles, accessories, parts, and services since 1993. The company offers free delivery and pick-up on the island for any 3-day and weekly rentals, free bike locks and free baskets for renters. Hilton Head Bicycle company offers rentals for bikes, electric bikes, trailers and baby seats for inquiring families. In addition to rentals, the company offers a variety of repairs and maintenance for bikes as well. The rental is located at 112 Arrow Road, Hilton Head Island, SC 29928 and can be reached at (843) 686-6888.

This story was originally published August 5, 2022 5:00 AM.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.