SEO Company in Hilton Head Island SC

If you are a business owner, there’s probably a good chance that you have asked yourself this question before. It’s a question that many entrepreneurs ask, and for good reason.

According to a recent study, the first five organic search results on Google account for about 67% of all website clicks. With more than 2.3 trillion Google searches in 2019 alone, it has become clear that if customers can’t find your website online, you’re missing out on a huge opportunity to grow your business.

The good news is, with a trustworthy SEO company in Charleston on your side and an effective SEO campaign, your website can show up on the first page of a Google search. The bad news is, many “SEO agencies” offering such services provide clients with outdated, a la carte options at ridiculous prices – and good luck getting them on the phone if you have a question that needs answering.

Unlike some of our competitors, mediocre customer service and ineffective digital marketing strategies aren’t in our digital DNA.

Our innovative, all-inclusive SEO patented technology and services work together to form a digital marketing machine, unlike anything on the market. We call it Local Magic®.

What local SEO services in Hilton Head Island can you expect? Keep reading to find out.

A Guide to Google My Business

Comprehensive Link Building

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Most veteran SEO professionals agree that one of the most important signals that Google uses to rank websites is backlinks. Backlinking is essentially a link that is created when one website links to another. According to recent statistics, 91% of webpages that don’t get organic traffic are because they don’t have any backlinks. Mr. Marketing solves this problem for you through comprehensive backlinking techniques, which adds authority to your website over time so that Google recognizes your website as trustworthy in your industry.

Online Review Management

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Positive online reviews can be incredibly beneficial for your business. 93% of online shoppers say that online reviews play a part in their purchasing decisions. The problem is, many business owners don’t have the time to request online reviews from happy clients, manage those reviews, or display them on their company’s website.

That’s where Mr. Marketing’s Review Manager comes in. Review Manager is the world’s first comprehensive reputation management system, allowing you to get more from your reviews. With Review Manager, you have the ability to request reviews via SMS and Email, track pending review requests, and even publish your most favorable reviews right to your website, with a few taps on your phone.

Website Optimization

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As local SEO consultants in Hilton Head Island, we see a lot of good-looking websites. While a website might be attractive on the surface, it needs to be optimized on the backend for it to have a better chance of showing up in a Google search. Our team of skilled web developers will optimize your website both on the surface and “under the hood”, so that your business gets noticed by customers who are already looking for the products or services you sell.

Website Hosting & Updates

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To make life a little easier, we are happy to host your website on our servers, so you don’t have to hunt down a separate hosting service. If you have updates that need to be applied to your website, we will handle the heavy lifting for you. We even implement security measures to prevent hackers from accessing your data.

Google Ads Management

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Here’s a fact you might not know – Google controls more about 71% of the search engine market. If you want customers to find your business online, you need to show up in Google searches. As part of a comprehensive digital marketing strategy in Hilton Head Island available from Mr. Marketing, Google Ads can be an excellent wayfor new clients to discover your business both on mobile devices and on desktops. Much like online reviews, however, managing a Google Ads campaign can be burdensome and time consuming for busy entrepreneurs. Our team will work closely with you to figure out the best ways to use Google Ads to your businesses’ advantage so that you can focus on day-to-day tasks while we grow your presence online.

Does Your Local SEO Company in Hilton Head Island Care?

At Mr. Marketing, we really do care about your businesses’ success. Many local SEO consultants in Hilton Head Island only care about their profits, but that’s not a mantra that we agree with at Mr. Marketing. For that reason, we also include monthly digital business coaching as part of our Local Magic package. That way, your knowledge of digital marketing grows alongside your businesses’ website rankings.

When We Say All-Inclusive, We Mean It

Believe it or not, you get even more customized SEO services in Hilton Head Island than those we listed above. While you may certainly pick and choose which digital marketing services work best for your unique situation, with our Local Magic package, you also gain access to:

  • Conversion Optimization
  • Programmatic Ad Management
  • Advertising Landing Page Development
  • Google My Business Management

So, what’s the next step? We encourage you to reach out to our office or fill out the submission form on our website to get started. Once we understand your goals and business needs, we’ll get to work right away, forming a custom marketing strategy for you. Before you know it, your phone will begin ringing, your reviews will start to pour in, your online connections will grow, and your website traffic will explode with interested clients looking to buy your products or services.

Latest News in Hilton Head Island

Let nature take its course in Hilton Head, South Carolina

The Mid-Island Tract sounds quite ordinary on the surface, not the sort of name that inspires enthusiasm. What it represents, however, is somewhat extraordinary.The 103-acre parcel in the center of Hilton Head Island sits inside the Mid-Island Initiative Area, another not too terribly thrilling moniker.But while the names - placeholders until something better comes along - are on the dry side, they represent a chance fo...

The Mid-Island Tract sounds quite ordinary on the surface, not the sort of name that inspires enthusiasm. What it represents, however, is somewhat extraordinary.

The 103-acre parcel in the center of Hilton Head Island sits inside the Mid-Island Initiative Area, another not too terribly thrilling moniker.

But while the names - placeholders until something better comes along - are on the dry side, they represent a chance for the island to truly determine what its future identity will be.

The town acquired the land in 2013 and for a time leased it to a private company, which in turn operated it as the Planters Row Golf Course.

The golf course has since closed, though its fairways, lagoons and pathways remain, and the town’s Master Plan recommended it be turned into a park. The popularity of turning old golf courses into new parks is a trend seen in other communities, according to the American Society of Landscape Architects.

The question is what kind of park will it be.

A team of consultants is working on plans for the park and Jennifer B. Ray, capital program manager, said she expects they will be sharing the initial concept for the park with the Town Council in December or January.

While planning is underway, the consultants from MKSK are also gathering community input on what will happen around the park, the area better known as that Mid-Island Initiative Area.

Here is the extraordinary part.

Hilton Head Island, struggling to balance the needs of its roughly 40,000 year-round residents with the people who work here and the millions of tourists who come each year, has a chance to reverse course and resist the urge of development.

The Mid-Island Tract could be reclaimed for nature.

It’s a course supporters like Kay Grinnell, president of the Hilton Head Audubon Society, are hoping and campaigning for across the island.

“I think this is a once in a lifetime opportunity,” Grinnell said.

Grinnell and her team envision what planners call passive recreation as opposed to the active type.

That means turning the Mid-Island Tract into a nature preserve with trails and little else except a restroom and parking for visitors. The rest, Grinnell hopes, would be “repurposed and turned back to nature.”

She suggests active recreation such as tennis courts and playing fields could remain at other island parks where some of those amenities already exist and reconditioned in the locations where they aren’t often used.

“Birding and ecotourism are growing and this would put that trend on steroids here,” she said.

Birding is, by all accounts, big business.

According to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, a 2016 report found there were about 45 million birders responsible for “trip-related and equipment-related expenditures” of nearly $96 billion in total industry output. The industry accounted for 782,000 jobs, and $16 billion in local, state, and federal tax revenue.

Like many island residents, Grinnell isn’t native to the island. She moved here like so many others because she found something she loved. “I fell in love with the nature,” she said.

She’s also one of those 45 million birders who travels for the hobby, staying in hotels, eating in restaurants, hiring guides, renting cars and buying equipment along the way.

Her group notes that some 300 species of birds regularly inhabit or visit the island, which sits directly on the Atlantic Flyway, the largest of the four principal migratory routes through the United States. The tract, for instance, contains the only known nesting colony of Red-headed Woodpeckers on the island.

The town’s online survey asks residents to share their thoughts about the possible uses of the Mid-Island Initiative Area, which includes a mix of old and new commercial developments, industrial uses, residential neighborhoods, the Hilton Head Island airport, town-owned parklands and conservation areas, and significant cultural resources including Union Cemetery and St. James Baptist Church.

Survey respondents are asked what they do when they visit the area and what’s missing.

The number one item missing, according to the survey so far, is a park.

That survey closes this Friday, Nov. 12, though Ray added that community input regarding the initiative area will also be gathered at an Open Park Day on Nov. 20.

Hilton Head officials have made a concerted effort to gather public input and we are optimistic that there has also been an effort to consider the opportunity that has presented itself.

It’s rare for 103 acres of land to sit idle in any resort town and yet here they are.

We urge the town to let nature take its (golf) course.

Fully vaccinated Beaufort Co. residents should now wear masks indoors, CDC warns. Why?

Federal health officials say that fully vaccinated residents in Beaufort County should mask up in indoor public places.Again.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as of early Thursday, had redesignated the Lowcountry county as having a “substantial” level of coronavirus transmission, CDC data show.The county had a “moderate” level of COVID-19 spread on Tuesday, which is when the CDC said i...

Federal health officials say that fully vaccinated residents in Beaufort County should mask up in indoor public places.

Again.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as of early Thursday, had redesignated the Lowcountry county as having a “substantial” level of coronavirus transmission, CDC data show.

The county had a “moderate” level of COVID-19 spread on Tuesday, which is when the CDC said it was safe for fully inoculated people to not wear face coverings in indoor settings like grocery stores and restaurants.

The government’s guidance for unvaccinated residents, meanwhile, has remained the same: Wear masks inside when in public.

The CDC news is disappointing for the Lowcountry, which as of late last week was one of only a couple regions in the United States that seemed to be faring well with coronavirus transmission.

South Georgia, almost all of Florida, parts of Mississippi and East Texas are now among the few spots in America where COVID-19 spread remains moderate. The South was hit hard by this past summer’s coronavirus surge, which was driven by the super-contagious delta variant.

The recent change in federal mask guidance for the Lowcountry, though, is not necessarily surprising.

Almost 75% of all U.S. counties, as of early Thursday, had “high” levels of coronavirus transmission, CDC data show. States in the Upper Midwest and Northeast are again facing spikes in infections as colder weather sets in. And South Carolina’s case numbers are starting to rise, too.

Dr. Brannon Traxler, the state’s director of public health, told reporters Wednesday that after recording a consistent drop in COVID-19 spread between early September and mid-November, cases “ticked up” in South Carolina last week, with more than 5,100 new infections reported statewide.

“I don’t want to hit the panic button,” Traxler said, “but we are strongly encouraging all South Carolinians to continue the safety protocols that helped us drive these numbers down.”

“This is especially important as millions of us around the state and hundreds of millions more across our nation gather with friends and family the next couple of days to celebrate Thanksgiving,” she said.

The Island Packet and Beaufort Gazette have compiled a guide to the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control’s sweeping set of new coronavirus safety recommendations for the 2021 holiday season: bit.ly/HolidaySafetyGuidance

Here are the latest Beaufort County coronavirus numbers from DHEC:

New cases reported Wednesday: 7 confirmed, 7 probable

New cases reported Tuesday: 4 confirmed, 1 probable

New cases reported Monday: 14 confirmed, 5 probable

New deaths reported from Monday to Wednesday: 2 confirmed, 0 probable

Seven-day case average: 11 confirmed infections per day

Two-week case rate: 99.4 cases per 100,000 people

Vaccination rate: 53.7% of residents have been fully vaccinated

Bluffton ZIP code, 29910: 2,844 cases

Hilton Head Island ZIP code, 29926: 1,105 cases

Hilton Head Island ZIP code, 29928: 459 cases

Okatie ZIP code, 29909: 772 cases

Beaufort ZIP code, 29902: 1,415 cases

St. Helena Island ZIP code, 29920: 446 cases

Hilton Head native now first person to thru-hike America’s 11 national scenic trails

Lore within the hiking community prevents backpackers from naming themselves, at least according to Constantine, a former Hilton Head Islander.“The trail community is very fun,” Constantine, also known as 27-year-old Ryan Bunting, said. “It’s actually very superstitiously bad luck to pick your own trail name.”Nicknames aside, Bunting said, he has had to deal with hypothermia and the toll of hiking up to 40 miles a day to meet his goal of becoming the first person to thru-hike the 11 U.S. National S...

Lore within the hiking community prevents backpackers from naming themselves, at least according to Constantine, a former Hilton Head Islander.

“The trail community is very fun,” Constantine, also known as 27-year-old Ryan Bunting, said. “It’s actually very superstitiously bad luck to pick your own trail name.”

Nicknames aside, Bunting said, he has had to deal with hypothermia and the toll of hiking up to 40 miles a day to meet his goal of becoming the first person to thru-hike the 11 U.S. National Scenic Trails. The National Scenic Trail is a trail system that spans thousands of miles and was established when President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the National Trails System Act in 1968.

Bunting started his journey at 21 when he walked the more than 2,180 mile-long Appalachian Trail. It ended after six years on Nov. 3 with a final hike on the North Country Trail that stretches from North Dakota to Vermont.

“It’s very hard to convey the feelings of what these trail systems mean, not just to the hikers,” Bunting said after completing his final 186-day-long trip along the NCT through eight states. “These trail systems mean a lot to these communities because they put you through places in this country that you would never find, I would never find, unless you were walking through them. It shows the kindness of strangers that a lot of people become jaded to in life.”

When he started hiking after suffering an injury that ended his ice hockey career at 18, Bunting said, he had no idea how much he would enjoy it.

“When I find a hobby or a sport, I kind of throw myself completely into it and my life revolves around that sport,” Bunting said. “I felt like I had been missing a part of myself because I wasn’t playing ice hockey anymore.”

It’s how he met his partner, Dana Burkett, also known as Magpie, in 2019.

It’s the basis for his business, 11skys, a clothing and equipment company for hikers, which he runs from the trails. Or wherever he can get a Wi-Fi signal, he said.

It also became a source of self-reflection and discovery, especially while hiking the 65-mile Natchez Trace trail for two weeks, all on a fractured foot, he said.

“There was not an if I would finish the trail, but how,” Bunting said. “I constantly questioned how I would finish the trial. It just tested me every single second, and I found a depth of myself that I hadn’t seen previously.”

For Bunting and Burkett, he said, the next step is spreading “trail magic,” a kindness given to hikers by strangers or fellow trail walkers in the community. The magic, Bunting said, can be anything from offering a hiker a cold soda on a hard day or a home-cooked meal.

“What we have been fantasizing about and really excited for is ... to give back to the community that gave us so much at this point and setting up trail magic for other long-distance hikers that are starting their journeys,” Bunting said.

Before he got his official trail name, Bunting was known as “Icy Hot” for putting hot sauce in his food to stop his shivering while hiking the Appalachian Trail, he said. His friend told him that it was too much of a mouthful and renamed him after a character in a movie.

“Back in Georgia, the uphills on the AT are very steep and the downhills are like knee breakers,” Bunting said. “As I was getting into hiking ... my first trail I would be like cussing everything on the uphills and praising everything I could find on the downhills and he compared that to the character Constantine being half good, half bad.”

Bunting has yet to see the 2005 American superhero horror movie, he said.

Will SC face a COVID-19 surge this winter? DHEC talks case trends, natural immunity

The global COVID-19 outlook is bleak. Medical centers in the Upper Midwest, including in Minnesota and Michigan, are grappling with a surge of coronavirus hospitalizations. A ...

The global COVID-19 outlook is bleak. Medical centers in the Upper Midwest, including in Minnesota and Michigan, are grappling with a surge of coronavirus hospitalizations. A concerning new variant has been discovered in South Africa. And deaths in Europe are quickly mounting.

The grim news raises a crucial question: Will there be another winter surge this year in South Carolina that rivals the devastating wave of COVID-19 cases that occurred in late 2020 and early 2021?

The Island Packet and Beaufort Gazette recently asked Dr. Brannon Traxler, the state’s director of public health, to weigh in on the Palmetto State’s pandemic trajectory.

Traxler warned that unless residents increasingly choose to wear face masks and get vaccinated, South Carolina likely will experience a spike in cases this holiday season, though the severity and timing of that uptick remains unclear.

Here’s what else Traxler had to say during a Wednesday briefing, during which reporters could not ask follow-up questions. Traxler’s responses have been edited for clarity and length.

Q: Based on the state’s epidemic curve in December 2020, when would you expect a post-Thanksgiving surge to hit South Carolina this year?

Traxler: It’s difficult to project — really this pandemic in general — but particularly when and how cases will rise, and what that curve would look like. Data from the previous year can’t really be used to project ... because we’re talking about COVID. At this time last year, we didn’t have a vaccine, but we also didn’t have that delta variant, which is more transmissible, so it all depends on how much we can increase our vaccination rates, and how safe South Carolinians stay when celebrating over the holidays.

If we increase our masking and our vaccinations, then we hopefully will not see a significant spike in cases. If we don’t practice those protocols, chances are we will see a spike, though it is still difficult to determine how soon and how significant (that may be). We do know it takes roughly a week, plus or minus a couple of days, to start to see the effect in a case curve from an event.

Q: Does the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control believe that, because of the surge of infections in South Carolina and other southeastern states this past summer, that any potential winter spike this holiday season will be blunted due to a heightened wall of natural immunity? If yes, to what extent?

Traxler: Natural immunity can certainly play some role, but we don’t know the duration of natural immunity in a person after an infection to know if or how well people who were infected in the summer — or even last winter — are still protected. The No. 1 way to prevent severe cases of COVID-19 and to end this pandemic is through vaccination. ... And I want to point out that even people with a history of prior COVID-19 infection benefit significantly, in regards to protection, if they get vaccinated.

Q: How worried are you about December and January this winter, given what happened in late 2020 and early 2021?

Traxler: It’s not so much about comparing the specific time frames because situations are very different (now) than they were a year ago, but in general, any time you have large amounts of unvaccinated and/or unmasked folks gathering together, especially indoors, which occurs during colder weather, COVID-19 can and will spread more rapidly. So, from that standpoint, there is concern we could see an uptick in cases and hospitalizations and deaths, which is why we’re pushing so hard for vaccinations and other safety protocols.

Q: Does DHEC have any COVID-19 immunity estimates for South Carolina that include both vaccinations and natural infections?

Traxler: Well, certainly we have our vaccination dashboard ... but beyond that, I don’t have data relevant to this question. Again, part of that goes back to just the entire scientific, medical and health communities — not only nationwide, but worldwide — not having the information to know how long somebody’s protection from natural immunity lasts or even widespread ways to measure that for the typical person in the public.

Q: In terms of coronavirus case investigations, what is DHEC seeing on the ground? Where are people regularly getting infected and who is commonly infecting them?

Traxler: That is difficult to say. Identifying how cases spread during a pandemic is tough, because you don’t always get or have an accurate representation of where and how the disease was contracted, and that’s not because people are trying to be misleading, it’s because they often don’t know.

Traxler on Wednesday also said that after recording a consistent drop in COVID-19 spread between early September and mid-November, cases “ticked up” in South Carolina last week, with more than 5,100 new infections reported statewide.

“I don’t want to hit the panic button,” Traxler said, “but we are strongly encouraging all South Carolinians to continue the safety protocols that helped us drive these numbers down.”

What’s at stake?

Between Dec. 1, 2020 and Jan. 31, 2021, South Carolina recorded 245,088 coronavirus cases, DHEC data show. That amounts to roughly 27% of all infections reported in the state since the outbreak first began.

“We need everyone on board,” Traxler said, “if we’re finally going to end this pandemic.”

Data in this story are current as of Friday morning.

SC City's Bill to Secure New Apparatus Soars $1.2M

Nov. 22—The town of Hilton Head Island will have to spend roughly $1.2 million more than it had initially expected to replace its aging fleet of fire trucks.The town had originally planned to buy eight new pumper trucks and two new quint vehicles — ladder trucks that also can pump water like fire engines — for about $6.2 million during fiscal year 2022, records show.Now, though, the island's Town Council has given staff members the go-ahead to spend $7.4 million on the project."I'm a little disappo...

Nov. 22—The town of Hilton Head Island will have to spend roughly $1.2 million more than it had initially expected to replace its aging fleet of fire trucks.

The town had originally planned to buy eight new pumper trucks and two new quint vehicles — ladder trucks that also can pump water like fire engines — for about $6.2 million during fiscal year 2022, records show.

Now, though, the island's Town Council has given staff members the go-ahead to spend $7.4 million on the project.

"I'm a little disappointed" about the cost increase, Fire Rescue Chief Brad Tadlock said.

Tadlock and John Troyer, the town's finance director, briefed council members on the situation last week.

The town bid out the new trucks after the fiscal year 2022 budget was approved in June. The budget included $6.2 million for the Fire Rescue fleet replacement.

But the town quickly realized that because of supply chain issues in the nation's pandemic-weary economy, the availability of fire trucks was "under pressure," records show.

The bid prices exceeded the budgeted funds, Troyer confirmed in a memo to Ward 5 representative Tom Lennox, chair of the Town Council's finance committee.

"The global supply chain has been disrupted," Troyer wrote. "Material prices are up significantly. Suppliers are hesitant in this environment to make commitments for fixed prices."

The economy is "crazy," he said in an interview.

The United States is facing a nationwide staffing crunch, a coronavirus-battered supply chain and shortages of products ranging from computer chips to toilet paper.

The town eventually decided that Safe Industries, a Pickens County-based equipment supplier for fire departments, had the best bid price — roughly $7.4 million.

But that still was about $1.2 million more than the town had originally budgeted.

Safe Industries agreed to hold its bid price only until Dec. 1, Troyer added, because additional price increases were expected in the market.

So the Town Council ultimately voted 7-0 last Tuesday to authorize Town Manager Marc Orlando to enter into a purchase agreement with Safe Industries to secure its $7.4 million price.

Tadlock, the town's fire chief, told council members that the current Fire Rescue trucks will be 14 years old next fall.

The town had originally planned to replace its fleet in 2017 or 2018, Tadlock said, but due to Hurricane Matthew's devastation, decided to postpone the costly project, "obviously not knowing a pandemic was coming."

Typically, fire departments of Hilton Head's size will replace their trucks after 10 to 15 years of use, Tadlock said in an interview.

That's because of the immense amount of wear and tear on Fire Rescue vehicles.

As trucks get older, their maintenance becomes more of a hassle and their electronic equipment falls out of date, among other things, Tadlock said.

The current Hilton Head fleet's technology, for example, was designed in 2005 or 2006, Tadlock said.

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